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LIBRARY OF 



LASELL JUNIOR COLLEGE 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



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fcOR.OF 
IBEOFORO 
9 L?T. 



Discount to Students of all Principal Educational Institutions. 



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Mrs. m. m. Ransom, 

DEALER IN 

JEWELRY, FANS, POCKET=BOOKS, BAGS, 
PICTURE FRAMES, 

CHINA NOVELTIES and UMBRELLAS. 
67 TEMPLE PUCE, BOSTON. 



BOOKS 



in all Departments of 
Literature . . . 



Can be found at our store. The largest assortment in 
Boston of the popular and standard authors. We are noted 
for low prices. 

DeWOLFE, FISKE & CO., the Archway Book Store. 

36 J and 365 Washington St., Boston. 



HOWARD BICYCLES, 

1898 MODEL. 

Price - - - - $75.00. 

Also, Fine Bicycles for ladies at lower prices. We 
invite inspection of our model 3 1 . 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. 



THE E. HOWARD WATCH AND CLOCK CO,, 

383 Wasliing'ton Street, Boston. 

41 Maiden Lane, New York. 



(I) 




mterGOilciiiate. 
Mm M Registry. 



COTRELL & LEONARD, 

472-478 Broadway . . . Albany, N. Y. 

ilAKEKJS OF THE 

CAPS, aOWNS, AND HOODS 

to Lasell, Wellesley, Eadcliffe, Mt. Holyoke, Bar- 
nard, Bryn Mawr, Elmira, Wells, Baltimore, Har- 
vard, Yale, Princetou, Columbia, Williams, Cornell, 
and the others. 

Go^w^n.® for the Pulpit and ttxe Bench.. 

Illu6tratHl Bulletin^ etc., on application. 



DREKA 

Flgii siaiioneiy ani Engmlng Mst, 

1121 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

COLLEGE INVITATIONS. 
STATIONERY. 

■ PROGRAMMES. 

BANQUET MENUS. 

FRATERNITY ENGRAVING. 
WEDDING INVITATIONS. 

RECEPTION CARDS. 
MONOGRAMS. 

COATS OF ARMS. 

ADDRESS DIES. 

HERALDRY AND GENEALOGY A SPECIALTY. 
Coats of Arms Painted for Framing. 



KAKAS BROS.' 

NEW FUR STORE, 

34=36 Bedford Street, Boston. 



EVERYTHING IN FURS. 



EVERYTHING AS REPRESENTED. 



EVERYTHING IN PLAIN FIGURES, 



FURS STORED 
And insured against loss by Fire or Moths. 



LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO. 



MAKUPACTURERS OF 



F=IRST-OLMSS 

^ ^ AND ^ ^ 

5tttmot: ®ecovaftott0^ 

Nos. Z^ to 48 Cornhill = = BOSTON. 

WM. H. HULL. HORACE W. STICKNEY. UNION B. TWITCHELL. 



(2) 




Your Attention is Invited ^ dt ^ 

To the Very Conveniently Arranged 
Train Service Afforded by . 

Tie Lake Store SPlKiiiiyaiiSouileinB'y 

Between Chicago and the East, 

IN BOTH DIRECTIONS. 



g^* ^* ^^ 



The Equipment of the Trains via this Route is of the very Highest Order, 
and embodies all of the comforts, luxuries and conveniences known to modern 
car builders. 

Printed matter giving full information will be sent on application. 



T. S. TIMPSON, 
Gen. Eastern Agent, 

BUFFALO, N. Y. 



A. J. SMITH, 

Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 



C. K. WILBER, 

Asst. Gen. Pass. Agent, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



(3) 



The Photographer to Lasell's, '94, '95, '96, 



WAS 



Charles W* Heam^ 
394 Boylston Street^ Boston* 



Special Rates given to Lasell Seminary Students. 



(A) 



COBB, ALDRICH & CO. 

T'fte ^ tenant jVew Store i^" 

Washington and Kneeland Streets* 



Situated in the corner of our elegant new store, between the two main entrances, is our 
Confectionery Department, which is one of the largest and handsom.est of any in this 
city. This is fully stocked with 

F^resti Confectionery 

of all kinds of the finest French Candies, including Nougatines, Bavarian, St. Nicholas, 

Montevideo, Nanon, Operas, Chocolate-Covered Caramels, Opera Caramels, 

Crystallized French Fruits, etc. Also the more common kinds. 

ALL OF WHICH ARE STFtICTL^5r AlXr> ABSOLXJTELl^ PXJItE, 

and sold at moderate prices. 



The Finest Grocery Store in America^ 



COBB, ALDRICH & CO. = = = BOSTON. 

(5) 



Shreve, Crump & Low Co. 




Give special attention to the designing and execution of 



SOCIETY BADGES, PINS and DEVICES, both in 



Gold and Silver* Designs furnished and estimates sub- 



mitted, on application, free of charge. Also Stationery 



for Class Day and other uses. Prizes in Silver, Gold 
and Bronze, suitable for Class presentation. ^ ^ ,3* 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW CO., Entire Buildi ng, cor. Tremont and West Sts. 

The (Connecticut Mutual ^ ^ 

^ ^ ¥ IiFE Insurance ^o. 



Assets, $63,588,660.98 



Surplus, $7,360,Q36.01 



THE CONNECTICUT MUTUAL stands by itself and occupies a thoroughly enviable position in life insurance. It was never 
before so strong or so deserving of confidence as it is to-day, and never had more of the public confidence than it has now. 

It offers plain life insurance, as protection to the family, and tries to make it attractive simply by making it perfect to that end 
and by keeping its cost down to the lowest possible point. It tries to realize the ideal results of a legitimate business; and it seeks 
to attract to its membership only those who want only such results, and do not want a speculation on their family's protection. 

The conservative course of the company has brought to it a conservative constituency, and these people are the best risks, for 
they are people who take care of themselves; and they are the best members, for they are stayers. 

JACOB L. GREENE, President. EDWARD M. BUNCE, Secretary. 

JOHN M. TAYLOR, Vice-President. DANIEL H. WELLS, Actuary. 

GEORGE E. WILLIAMS = = 



Gen'l Agt., 53 Devonshire St., Boston, Mass. 

(6) 



be ® 8o|,ton ® and © ^Ibapg ^. ^. 



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//as Me 6esf through car service from New 



England to the commercial centres of the 
West, and is the only line running through 



cars via 



1 



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New York Central & Hudson River R. R., 



Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Ry., 



Big Four Route (C. C. C. & St. L Ry.), and 



Michigan Central R. R. 



(Passing in full view of Niagara Falls.) 



Trains Vestibuled. 
Complete Through 



G 



IVING tourists the benefit of a through service without 
requiring the prepayment of a sufficient sum to cover all 
expenses contingent on a trip of several weeks' or months' duration. 
Uining Car Service. < Passage and berth tickets only being required, all other expenses 
while in transit or sojourning in the West are left discretionary with the traveller, who is thus enabled 
to go and come at pleasure, patronizing such hotels and lines as may best suit his convenience. 

(7) 



Gifts 



Twenty-two of the most Complete Departments, with Up-to-date Goods 

for Weddings, Birthdays, Anniversaries. 

Dian^OI^d J)epartDqei^t. Solitaire, Twin and Circlet Diamond Rings. 

$25.00, $50.00, $75.00, $100.00. 

StatiOI^ery ]3C partus ei^t. High-class stationery from the best makers. 

El^graVipg. Card, Society and Wedding Work a Specialty. 



A. 


STOWFLL & 


CO., 24 WINTER St., 


Boston. 






Women's and Misses' 






Blanket Wraps . 


. $5.00 to $15.00 


Mackintoshes to order . $10 00 to $37.50 


Sleeve Buttons . . . 


$0.50 to $7.50 




Flannel Wraps 




. 10.00 " 24.00 


Cravenettes to order . 


10.50 " 32.00 


Collar Buttons . . . 


.10 " 2.50 




Cheviot Wraps 




6.50 " 13.00 


Walking Gloves 




2.00 


Umbrellas 


1.50 " 18.50 




Bath Wraps . 




8.50 " 12.00 


Driving Gloves 




2.50 


Abdominal Bands . . 


1.50 " 2.50 




Bath Slippers . 




1. 00 " 1.50 


Golf Gloves . . 




2.00 


Woolen Knee Caps 


2.00 




Golf Waists . 




5 00 " 9.00 


Bicycle Gloves . . 




1.50 


Fleecy Lined Bed Hose 


2.25 




Flannel Waists 




5.00 " 9.00 


Satin or Silk Stocks 




2.00 


Couch Covers . . . 


6.00 " 10.00 




Cheviot Waists 




5.00 


Hunting Stocks . 




1-25 


Traveling Rugs . . . 


7.00 " 25.00 




Sweaters . . 




5.00 " 6.00 


Riding Cravats 




1.25 


Plush Rugs .... 


25.00 




Pajamas . . 




4.50 " 16.00 


String Ties . . . 




.50 " 1.25 


Sleeping Robes . . . 


3-5° " 5-75 




Union Undergarmen 


ts . 2.50 " 6.75 


Stick Pins . . . 




•35 " 2-50 


Colored Dolis . . . 


2.00 




Golf Capes . 


• 


. 15.00 


Sleeve Links .... .50 " 25.00 







Blanket Wraps 

For the Nursery. For the Sick Room. For the Bath. 
For Steamer Traveling. For the Railway Carriage. For 
Yachting. 

For Men, Women, Children, and the Baby, ^2.75 to ^35, 
with Hood and Girdle complete. 



Humber Bicycles, $73.00 to $75.00. 

Noyes Bros., 

Washington and Summer Streets, Boston, Mass., U. S. A. 
C8) 



EDWARD E. BABB & CO. 



D E ALE R S IN 



W^a/%/^ 



@f every <iesei?fpti@2i)j 



'Cil@©l 1B)@@1KS m4 



'Upplfi 



c o o o 




25 Arch Street 



BOSTON, MASS. 



CH ICAGO, 
MILWAUKEE & 



ST. PAUL 



RAILWAY. 



FOR TICKETS TO ALL POINTS 
WEST, SOUTHWEST, AND . . . 
NORTHWEST OF CHICAGO . . . 
WRITE TO 



C A. BROWN, 

NEW ENGLAND PASSENGER AGENT, 

Old State House, BOSTON, MASS. 



C. W. DAVIDSON, Pres. 

Newtonville. 



F. F. DAVIDSON, Treas. 

Auburndale. 



The Thomas Long Co. 

JEWELERS 

and 

SILcVERSMlTHS, 



77 Summer Street = 



Boston. 



ESTABLISHED 1870. 



INCORPORATED 1896. 



(9) 



n A. JENKINS 8c CO, i I t t 

LADIES' HATTERS. .^ -^ .^ .^ 



^g FECIAL AND UNIQUE STYLES in ... . 
^^^DRESS HATS AND ENGLISH TURBANS. 



e 



OUR 



ENGLISH WALKING AND SAILOR HATS 



m RE FINE IN QUALITY AND PRACTICAL IN STYLE, 
^KLmADE of selected ENGLISH BRAIDS 



e 



Sole Boston Agents for 407 WASHINGTON STREET. 

Connelly^s New York Hats. Boston. 

(ID) 




-0^ 



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'9G. 



VOLUME VIII. 



LASELL SEMINARY, 

AUBURNDALE, MASSACHUSETTS, 

1898. 



^ 



To the Lasell To Bes and Have ^eens. 



e^ 




EDWARD LASELL, 

Py-ofi'Sdor of Ctieinistri/, inUiaiiis College. 

FOUNDER OF LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 




CHARLES C. BRAGDON, 
Principal. 




X 



to 



I 
o 



5oard of TrOv^tee^. 



Rev. Wm. R. Clark, D. D. 

Rev. C. Rarkhurst, D. D. 

Rrof. Jules Luquiens. 
C. C. Bragdon. 

Mrs. C. C. Bragdon. 



(17) 



PacaltY- 



CHARLES C. BRAGDON, M. A., 
Principal. 



ELIZA H. KENDRICK, Ph. D., 

Latin, Greek. 



CAROLINE A. CARPENTER, 

Assistant Principal. 
English Literature and LListory. 

MRS. SUSAN GEORGE JONES, 
Manners., Dress. 

REV. CHARLES W. GALLAGHER, 

Pastor. 
Bible and English. 



ALICE M. HOTCHKISS, 

LListory, English Literature, 

Civil Government., 

Political Economy, and Logic. 



HERBERT L. RICH, Ph. B., 

Natural Sciences. 



JEANNE Le ROYER, 
Fre7ich. 



WILLIAM J. ROLFE, A, M., 

Shakespeare. 



HERMINE STUVEN, 
German. 



LILLIAN M. PACKARD, Ph. B., 
Mathematics . 



BLANCHE C. MARTIN, 

Physical Culture, Oratory. 



MARY P. WITHERBEE, 

English. 



KATE ADAMS, 

Assistant in Gymnasium. 



(i8) 



COL. GEORGE H. BENYON, 

Military Drill. 



S. E. GOLDSTEIN, 

Violin. 



J. WALTER DAVIS, 

Voice Culture, Chorus Sin^^ing. 



ADELINE L. ADAMS, 

History of Art. 



HENRY M. DUNHAM, 
Organ. 



NELLIE B. DANFORTH, 

Guitar, Mandolin. 



RICHARD ANDREW, 

Drawing, Painting. 



ANNA BARROWS, 

Cooking, Defnonsirations 
a7id Practice. 



ANGELINE C. BLAISDELL, 
Book-keeping, Penmanship. 



MARTHA E. RANSOM, 

Gymnastics, Swimming. 



ALICE A. CUTTING, 
Dress Cutting. 



JOSEPH A. HILLS, 

Pianoforte, Theojy, Harmony. 



MARY L. NUTT, 

Nurse. 



(19) 



m 








. ♦ i«w»i ■ 


% ^ V .. ^ ^ 









Carita L. CvKVis, Editor-in- Chief. 

Frances Allen, Evelyn Ebert, Ruth Rishell, Elise Scott, 

Assistant Editors. 
Katiierine Mason, Avila Grubbs, 

Business Managers. 

(20) 



Marietta Sisson, 



Vorvort. 



■,tiiz^'-^y,yj y'.)\ 




h'MJ-yJfffiSIKitJiKr i^ 



S the Board of Editors for the AUerlei of '99, we find ourselves face to face with the 
ever-much-to-be-dreaded vorwort. Though 'tis a time-honored institution, were we to follow 
our own inclinations we should entirely omit it, but, as custom demands it, we submit as 
gracefully as possible. It shall, however, be, in very truth, as short as the average author 
promises the reader the preface shall be, though the promise is so often and " so shamelessly broken. 
The Board wishes to thank most heartily the members of the Faculty and the friends who have 
so kindly and ably helped them, and who have had so large a share in making the Allerlei what 
it is. We have only three things to beg of our readers, — we will not lose ourselves or them in the 
mazes of "fifthly" as the old-time preachers used to do. Our firstly is ; "Be lenient," This is indeed 
our maiden effort of the kind ; we have done our best. Our secondly is addressed especially to Lasell 
girls: "Do not be grieved or offended, either at having been mentioned or at not having been men- 
tioned." We have tried to be considerate of all. Our third, and lastly, is : " Enjoy it." We have tried 
to make the Allerlei of '99 entertaining. With these requests, and with all good wishes, we present 
the Allerlei — loved by us because it is our own — to our friends for their pleasure and enjoyment. 



(21) 



Tt)e Classes. 



Freshman. 

A little girl, a frightened look, 

Short skirts, some curls, a brand-new book ; 

A quivering lip, a sob, a tear, — 

She is the Freshie who comes here. 



Sophomore. 

An air which says, " I know it all " ; 
Long skirts, hair up, has grown quite tall ; 
A haughty glance, a head held high, 
She '11 be a Junior — by and by. 



Junior. 

So dignified — a man or two ; 
A dance, a " Prom." she can't go to 
A worried look — the Allerlei ! ! 
The Junior girl will do or die. 



Senior. 

A tired look, late hours, no sleep, 
Hard work, an essay, thoughts so deep ; 
A cap, a gown, an air sedate — 
She is the Senior of '98. 



(23) 



Senior Cla55. 



Motto : " On a rien pow' rie?i.^'' 
Class Colors: Green and White. Class Flower: White Rose and Maiden Hair Fern. 

Honorary Member. 

WILLIAM Mckinley. 



Emma H. Goll 
Anna Ampt 
KiTTiEBEL Chapman 
Emma Aull 



Name. 

Helen Abbott 
Elisabeth Allen 
Anna Ampt . 
Emilie Anderson 
Emma Aull 
Martha Baker 
Alice Burnham 
Ada Cadmus . , 
Kittiebel Chapman 
Ruth Crandall 
Clifford Dasher 
Clara Davis 
May Emery 
Emma Goll 
Edith Grant 
Sophie Hall 
Luella Houghton 
Mary Johnson 
Alice Kimball 
Caroline Kendall 
Ruth Kimball 
Maud Mayo . 
Ruth Merriam 
Jane Myrick , 
Emma Smith , 
Virginia Wilson 



Club. 
Lasellia 
S. D. 
S. D. 
Lasellia 
S. D. 
Lasellia 
S. D. 
S. D. 
Lasellia 



S. D. 
Lasellia 
S. D. 
S. D. 
S. D. 

Lasellia 
Lasellia 



Lasellia 

Lasellia 
S. D. 
S. D. 



President, 
Vice-President. 

Secretary. 
Treasurer. 



Residence. Room. 

Dexter, Me 24 

Omaha, Neb 26 

Wyoming, Ohio . . . . . . . 18 

Whitewater, Wis. . . . . . . 57 

Kansas City, Mo 66 

Jamaica, W. I. ....... 67 

Manchester, N. H 28 

Jersey City, N. J 33 

Elgin, 111 36 

Auburndale, Mass. ...... 

Savannah, Ga. ....... i 

Wyoming, Ohio ....... 23 

Waltham, Mass G. H. 

Chicago, 111. 

New York, N. Y 

West Port, N. Y 

Red Oak, Iowa 

Manchester, N. H 

Presque Isle, Me. ...... 

Leominster, Mass. 

Clarendon, Iowa ....... 

Foxcroft, Me. ....... 

Meriden, Conn 

Yarmouthport, Mass 



Chicago, 111. 
Urbana, Ohio 



34 

25 

22 

30 
58 
39 
65 
29 

38 
29 

32 
38 
44 



(25) 



Tf)e 'c)& C'nterpri^e. 




HE Class of '98 has undertaken a grand and glorious work, one in which every old girl 

ought to be interested. We are determined to raise $25,000 to build a new hall. The 

hall will fill the need for a more commodious chapel, but we will call it our assembly 

room, for it will be used for all entertainments, and will contain stage and dressing 

rooms. Surrounding this room is to be a gallery, lighted by a sky-light, where the Lasell pictures 

are to be hung. The lower part of the building we hope to have fitted up for club and society use. 

The building, together with the land on which it stands, is to be deeded to the Alumnae 

Association when completed. We expect to raise this amount by contributing to it ourselves, and 

also by the liberal contributions of Lasell's loyal daughters and friends ; and we beg you to aid us 

by your enthusiastic support. It is the earnest desire of the Class of '98 to leave this building 

completed when we leave our alma mater, and this can be accomplished if each will give according 

to her means. As you love Lasell, girls, help us in our undertaking. 

Class of '98. 



(26) 



Ninet^-Eigl)t'5 Departare. 



At Lasell, an institution 
For instruction of youiig women 
(Very small compared with Harvard, 
Very large compared with some schools), 
There were once four noble classes, 
Freshmen, Sophomores, and Juniors, 
And the Seniors, mighty people. 
Little " Preps " bloomed there unnoticed, 
. Fresh and verdant in the sunshine. 
But I must not write of such things, 
My concern is with the Seniors. 
They were tall, a handsome class, too ; 
Yes ! their numbers boasted beauties 
Of both light and dark description. 
In athletic games, their prowess 
Wonder was to under-class girls ; 
For they handled racquet, paddle, 
Dumb-bells, clubs, and even rifles, 
Swords and bayonets so piercing. 
They could play a basket-ball game 
To astonish even Yale men ; 
And their skill in driving, swimming, 
Was like that of Ducky-daddies, 
In their lessons they were perfect, 
And the teachers, French and German, 



(27) 



Latin, Science, History, Music, 
Even Ethics, the mysterious, 
Gave the palm unto the Seniors. 

Four long years the Seniors studied, 
Worked from dawn till half-past nine bell 
(For no midnight oil is wasted 
At Lasell, their Alma Mater). 
Worked until their heads were bursting, 
Stood up for each other bravely 
In all tests of strength and wisdom. 
But all good things have an ending, 
So had Ninety-eight, the mighty, 
When, at last, with essays finished. 
Side by side they stood on Class Night, 
Capped and gowned in solemn blackness. 
And the farewell words were spoken. 
One who 'd been, through storm and sunshine. 
Five long years a Ninety-eight girl. 
Spoke in accents sad and mournful : 
" Fare you well, O under-class girls ! 
You will lonely be without us. 
You will miss our good class leader, 
Who for two long years has led us 
In the paths which we have trodden. 
You will miss her in the drill hall. 
You will miss her in the chapel. 
No more see her summer head-gear 
Out among the snows of winter. 
You will miss our Secretary, 
She who engineered our class book 
Safely through its early struggles. 
You will miss our music genius, 
Who has played so long in chapel, 

(28) 



Played and sung with so much sweetness. 
You will miss those whom a Senior 
Called the "silliest girls at school here." 
Yes, you'll miss their joyous laughter, 
And their little songs and speeches. 
You will miss the Kappa Kappa 
And their honorary member, 
Who is loved by all three maidens 
With mysterious devotion. 
You will miss us, one and all, girls, 
When we 're gone forever from you ; 
Gone to make life bright for some one 
In a land far distant from you. 
Now farewell, farewell, O Specials ! 
We have many friends among you, 
And some hearts of yours are breaking 
At the nearness of our parting. 
Fare you well, O little Freshmen, 
Who've adored us from a distance! 
Fare you well, O Sophomores mighty 
(At least, mighty in your own eyes). 
Fare you well, O Juniors haughty. 
May you take our place as well as 
We have taken Ninety-seven's." 

Ceased the voice, then, of the speaker. 

Music sad and wailing sounded, 

And the Seniors, marching slowly. 

Left their sorrowing, weeping schoolmates. 

May they be for aye remembered. 



(29) 



Junior Ci^ss. 



Name. 

Frances Allen 
Margaret Bailey 
Emily Bissell . 
Elsie Burdick 
Carol Case 
Gertrude Confer 
Emma Cleaves 
Carita L. Curtis 
Mabel C. Currie 
Nelle Daughenbau: 
Evelyn Ebert . 
Laura Geohegan 
Avila Grubbs . 
Myrtle Hewson 
Elisabeth Hunt 
Alice Jenks 
Ethel Johnson 
Mabel Marston 
Katherine Mason 
Josephine Milliken 
Helen Rishell 
Ruth Rishell . 
Elise Scott 
Maritta Sisson 
Gertrude Watson 
Mary Vance . 
Edith Moulton 
Alice Kendall 



Motto; '■• Labor omnia vincet.'''' 

Class Colors : Purple and White. Class Flower : Daisy. 

Class Yell : Three times ten times three plus nine, 
We 're the Class of Ninety-nine. 

Honorary Member : 



Club. 
S. D. 
Lasellia 
S. D. 
S. D. 
S. D. 

Lasellia 
S. D. 
S D. 
Lasellia 
S. D. 
S. D. 
Lasellia 
S D. 
S D. 
Lasellia 

S D.* 

Lasellia 

Lasellia 



Lasellia 
S D. 
S. D. 

Lasellia 



Residence. 

St Paul 
Marion, Me. 
Rockville, Conn. . 
Hartford, Conn. . 
Highland Park, Mass. 
Oil City. Penn. . 
Pigeon Cove, Mass. 
Omaha, Neb. 
New York, N. Y. 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Wichita, Kansas . 
Harodsburg, Ky. . 
Kansas City, Mo. . 
Kansas City, Mo . 
Wyatt Point, R. L 
Hallowell, Me. . 
Yarmouth, Me. 
Boone, Iowa 
Saco, Me. 
Newton, Mass. 
Newton, Mass. 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Woburn, Mass 
Milwaukee, Wis. . 
Salem, Mass. 
Kirkwood, Miss. . 



Room. 
31 

3 

31 

. 64 

28 

60 

Annex 5 

35 
41 

ID 

25 

Annex 10 
23 
70 
40 

Annex 1 1 

5 
27 

6 

■ 58 



G. 



H. 

41 

• 63 

16 

19 

Annex 9 



(30 



Tf)e Class of '99. 




jITTING here by a cosey fire, and dreaming of bygone days and bygone pleasures, I think 

what rejoicing there was in September of Ninety-seven, when we returned, — full-fledged 

W Juniors. How we snubbed the lower classes, the pufifed-up Sophomores, and the green 

little Freshmen, who were vainly seeking handkerchiefs to dry their tears; how we 

tripped lightly through Lasell's classic halls on weekday mornings, hunting for crayon 

and eraser for our news-board work, while the Sophs, stood gazing in rapture at our wonderful 

knowledge of the affairs of the day ; even the Seniors wishing they were on the news-board 

committee ; but in vain, for we are the Juniors, the Class of '99, and ours is the news-board. 

Naturally, the first thing we did was to organize, and at this ceremony what delight reigned, 
when we found what a large number of newcomers were to be Juniors, making us the largest class 
in school ! And these recruits, too, were so filled with energy and ambition, and have spurred us 
on so rapidly, that our brains have been working with unusual brilliancy in all our hard duties, 
especially in our AUerlei. In this latter work we wish to extend our thanks to the Senior Class, 
who have been so very kind to us, offering hints, suggestions, and ideas. Doubtless, they thought 
that we had been so joyfully surprised at their AUerlei and that our exclamations of wonder and 
admiration thereat, so indicative of their supremacy of genius, that rack our brains as we might, we 
could never hope to equal in our book the wit and general excellence of that precious volume of 
theirs. But we will not blow our own trumpet. The reader shall judge of our success for himself, 
and meanwhile we go on with our class history. 

(32) 



In our class meetings we had very jolly times, and naturally enough one of our staples of 
conversation at such times has been " Junior Business." On Monday evenings we rush out of 
chapel, run for our mail, and then tear down to " No. 5," half expecting to see our dignified 
president with a cold smile, or a sarcastic remark on her lips; but we have, in fact, always been 
disappointed, for who ever saw "Joe" that way? She is as pleasant as a May-day, and manages 
the class affairs in a manner worthy of Mr. McKinley. Now we are wondering what we shall do 
when, after ninety-nine, we are scattered abroad over the face of America. Of one thing I am sure : 
we shall never forget the ardent pleadings of Miss C. for " Jokes between the Acts." 

But since time and tide wait for no man, I can make only a brief mention of our illustrious 
members, among whom are " Joe," she who earnestly begs " Myrt " to " address the Chair" ; our business 
men, Miss M., " Mile. Baby," and later Miss S., who one and all so thrill us when they tell of their 
struggles with Boston advertisers, or those whom we wish to be such; our vocalists. Misses C, M., 
M., B., and G., — the latter, although never giving public exhibitions of her skill, is still very proficient 
on the mandolin; Misses W., R., H., E., and B., all of whom are Professor Hill's pride and joy; 
Mr. Andrews' apt pupil. Miss K., who has but lately joined our ranks; Misses D. and F., who are 
models of chapel deportment ; Miss C, our very able "editor-in-chief," and Miss R., on the "Board." 
There are, too, these other celebrities who help to make the wheels go 'round, — Misses A., B., C, 
C, J., S., v., and your humble servant, the hard-worked historian. 

With such a class as this we could have had only the pleasantest of times, and cannot but 
prove a credit to our teachers, and to dear old Lasell. 

VVe thus present our history to you, and would have you remember that, 

' The Seniors' time is nearly run; 
Next year we '11 put on airs, 
And departing leave behind us 
Footprints just as large as theirs." 

(33) 



3opf)oiDore Cias$. 



MoiTo : " She conquers who conquers herself." 



Class Colors : Crimson and Gold. Class Flower : Carnation. 



Carloti-a Elling 
Ida Trowbridge 

Ida Basch 



Name. 

Ida Basch 
Ruth Crouch 
Carlotta Elling . 
Arminta Henne 
Thomacina Libby 
Jessie McCarthy 
Ethelyn Prentice 
Helen Ramsdale 
LaVerne Reynolds 
Louise Thatcher 
Ida Trowbridge 



Club. 

Lasellia 
S. D. 
S. D. 

S. D. 
S. D. 

Lasellia 
Lasellia 



President. 








Vice-President. 


1 Secretary. 
1 Treasurer. 


Residence. Room. 


Passaic, N. J. . . . . . . 12 


Erie, Penn. 








49 


Virginia City, Montana 








24 


Titusville, Penn. 








J.H. 


Saco, Me. 








78 


Austin, 111. 








3 


LeRoy, N. Y. . 








64 


Woburn, Mass. 








43 


Brockton, Mass 








73 


Benningion, Vt. 








• 36 


South Framingham, Mass 








54 



(35) 



MUtofY of fl)e "Cla^s of tl)e Centor^." 




|T is generally the chief desire of the historian of a class to find some unique way of recording 

its progress toward the final goal, and therefore I hesitate before taking my pen to tell of the 

doings of the " Naughty-Naughts," in order that the events of our unlucky thirteen may be 

related in a manner unlike those of previous annals. 
After many weary hours of thought, I have at last come to the conclusion that it is indeed true that 

history is but a repetition of itself, and, although our career as a class has not yet been one of such signal and 

peculiar briUiance as to set the world on fire, nevertheless we may claim to be loyal and persevering, and 

resolved to leave those who come after us a creditable record, one which will be a worthy example for the 

weary strugglers plodding up the rocky paths of learning. 

From the heights to which we have climbed we look down compassionately upon less advanced toilers, 

as we in our turn are credibly reported to be looked down upon by the would-be superior Juniors. Whether 

they are superior or not is a question which they do not deign to consider, but we have serious doubts about 

this superiority, — doubts which a queer remark made by one of the Juniors in the Trigonometry class tends to 

confirm. This guileless Junior, it seems, innocently asked the teacher one day what the number standing before 

an example meant. The crushing reply was, " Miss F , what does the number of an example usually mean to 

you?" We trust, for the sake of the class honor, that our Junior sisters are seldom found tripping in this way. 

^36) 



We of " 1900" are an especially talented "baker's dozen," boasting of unusual genius in many directions, 
especially in those of art and music. Our principal artist excels in the use of the pen, and not only does she 
study penmanship, but also practices it by "writing volumes" every day. We also have among us a distinguished 
impersonator, and a prominent basket ball player. We do not, however, neglect our more solid studies for these 
accomplishments, which fact could be proved if there were time and space. 

As a class, though small in number, we are mighty in spirit. We have been safely steered by our sturdy 
captain through the trials and troubles of class meeting. Our first and greatest difficulty, which was to us no 
mere trifle, was in selecting a motto and a class flower. At our first session, thirteen eager girls, ready with 
thirteen positive opinions, at once agreed to retain the motto and the flower chosen the year before. But who 
ever before heard of a class settling an important question like that without wrangling, least of all, a class of 
thirteen ? Our final decision fell upon red and gold as true symbols of our class, — the red standing for our 
royalty, creative power, and class affection, while the gold is symbolical of our brightness. 

Determined to have a motto that all could understand, we decided to have it, by all means, in our 

native tongue. One of our diligent classmates brilliantly suggested the following : " She conquers herself who 

conquers English." We readily consented to this, for it seemed to us that after one had conquered "English" 

the conquest of self would be a very small matter indeed ! 

In spite of our trials and tribulations, we do not complain, or consider ourselves burdened with more 

than the average share of misfortune ; but, on the contrary, shall feel like congratulating ourselves if the future 

be as bright and pleasant as the past has been. 



(37) 




-' // 



^/acJ^rffB, 



ari>e 1 



Pre5l)n)an ClasS- 



Motto : " No7i sobir solum.^'' 

i. Class Colors: Gold and White. Class Flower: Marguerite. 

Jessie Kump, President. Madora Marsh, Vice-President. Klara Andersen, Secretary afid Treasurer. 



Nanir. 

Klara Andersen 
Isabella Clemens 
Elizabeth Cossar 
Mary Davies 
Eva Ferris 
Blanche Goll 
Esther Hoover . 
Mary Houghton 
Jessie Kump 
Bessie Legg 
Edith Locke 
Madora Marsh . 
Katherine McCoy 
Elsie Reynolds 
Bertha Sheldon 
Genevieve Slayton 
Elizabeth Starks 
Mary Thomas . 
Caroline Thomson 
Katherine Tompkins 
lone Tucker 
Gertrude Vreeland 



Club. 
Lasellia 

Lasellia 

Lasellia 
S. D. 
S. D. 

S. D. 



S. D. 



S. D. 
Lasellia 

Lasellia 



Resirience. 

Whitewater, Wis. 
Pottsville, Penn. . 
Manchester, N. H. 
Towando, Penn, . 
South Norwalk, Conn. 
Chicago, 111. . 
Miamisburg, Ohio 
Red Oak, Iowa 
Kansas City, Mo. . 
Worcester, Mass. . 
Jerseyville, 111. 
Glens Falls, N. Y. 
Kane, Penn. 
East Haddam, Conn. 
Providence, R. I. . 
Manchester, N. H. 
Middletown, Conn. 
Peabody, Mass. 
Crawfordsville, Ind. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. . 
Taylor, Texas 
Jersey City, N. J. . 



Room. 



• 










Annex 



57 

43 

6 

6o 

63 
40 
18 
30 
70 

?>1 
53 
65 
53 
4 
9 
47 
26 

ID 
I I 

56 

7 
6 



(39) 



nistor^ of tl)e ClasS of 190I. 





^T is with great misgivings that the historian takes up her pen in the hope to impress the reader 
with a sense of the signally fine qualities of the Freshman class. We are to have the honor of 
being Lasell's first Twentieth Century class. Twentieth Century girls ! Yes, and you shall see that 
when we are Seniors, and don the cap and gown, we shall have proved ourselves able to wear this 
honor with grace and ease. 

The upper-class girls gave us a hearty welcome when we arrived last fall. They took us to 
walk, and incidentally gave us some advice, — or perhaps it would be better to say hints — such as, 

"Miss W likes the front benches to be filled first," and " Mile, demands that one ' parle Francais 

ou Chinois.' " We have taken good heed to these suggestions, and have thus far succeeded very well 
in escaping censure, as a class, by the Powers that Be. Algebra — we have gone to the bottom 
of it, finished it, and laid it away on the shelf; nor did Plane Geometry, with its bewilderment of lines 
straight, curved, and otherwise, and its complexity of angles (which some of us persisted in spelling 
"angels," — woe the day!) long time bar our onward progress to Sophomorehood, but was 

(40) 



stormed by us in solid phalanx, the walls breached, the fortress taken in triumph, thanks to the 
good generalship of doughty Captain P , and the enthusiasm and bravery of the rank and file. 

Perhaps I ought to mention that our class meetings are noted for their full (?) attendance. The 
interest and loyalty of every member to her class was finely illustrated on the occasion when our 
President, having to choose the class historian, was really embarrassed by the multiplicity of candidates 
all eager (?) for this distinguished honor. 

This school year, just drawing to its close, has been, perhaps, somewhat uneventful to us as 
a class ; but if the saying, " Happy is the nation that has no history," applies equally well to a 
class, our class should be a very happy one. Thus 1901 marches on, ready to defend its name 
from any malicious attack, and to uphold the honor of Lasell, of which it is one of the stoutest 
defences and the Seminary's pride and joy, bearing ever in mind its motto, *' Non nobis solum." 



uO 



^peciaU. 



Name. 

Flora Allen 

Alice Ames 

Alice Ashley 

Carolyn Baldwin 

Laura Birdsey 

Elfleda Bond 

Elsie Clarke 

Mary Clokey 

Mabel Coffin 

Alice Conant 

Abbie Congdon 

Bessie Cooke 

Edna Cooke 

Ella Cotton 

Caroline Cashing 
Margaret Dealy 
Lorena Fellows . 
Blanche Gardiner 
Emily Ginn 
Marion Harrower 
Grace Houghton 
Emma Ives 
Eva Kennard 
Edith Knight . 
Gertrude May . 
Florence Pooler 
Isabel Preston . 
Grace Richardson 
Elizabeth Robertson 
Nelle Robertson 
Marion Safford . 
Mary Shuberth . 
Delia Stacy 
Margaret Tarr . 
Kathrme Tebbs 
Irene Thomas . 
Mary Thomson . 
Anna Welles 
Irene Wellington 
Mary White 
Alma Widstrand 
Anna Willis 



Club. 



Lasellia 
Lasellia 
Lasellia 
S. D. 



Lasellia 



S. D. 
S. D. 

Lasellia 



S. D. 

Lasellia 

Lasellia 



Lasellia 
Lasellia 



Lasellia 

Lasellia 
S. D. 

S. D. 
Lasellia 



Residence. 
Brookfield, Mass. 
Spencer, Mass. . 
Norward, N. Y. . 
Middletown, Conn. 
Middletown, Conn. 
Chicago, 111. 
Fairhaven, Mass. 
Decatur, 111. 
Wauseon, Ohio . 
Camden, N. Y. . 
Wautucket, Mass. 
Whitney's Point, Mass 
West Winstead, Conn 
Omaha, Neb. 
Dover, N. H. 
Manchester, N. H. 
Bangor, Me. 
Wilkesbarre, Penn. 
Balfast, Me. 
Wilkesbarre, Penn. 
Columbus, Ohio . 
Stratford, Conn. 
Omaha, Neb. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Auburn, Me. 
Strauhegan, Me. 
Muncie, Ind. 
Erie, Penn. 
Jacksonville, 111. 
Jacksonville, 111. 
Sharon, Mass. 
Miamisburg, Ohio 
Belchertown, Mass. 
Rockport, Me. 
Winchester, Ky. 
Proctor, Vt. 
Crawfordsville, Ind. 
Le Roy, N. Y. . 
North Oxford, Mass. 
Milroy, Penn. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Jasper, Ky. 



Room. 





15 




9 


Annex 


9 




13 




13 




14 


. 


39 


Annex 


8 


Annex 


10 


. 


51 


Annex 


4 




76 




48 




35 


. 


7 


Annex 


4 




20 




62 




48 


. 


62 




19 


• 


15 




44 


. 


42 


. 


51 




20 




7 




47 


. 


8 




8 


Annex 


8 




52 


. 


54 


Annex 


5 


. 


73 




76 




II 


• 


27 


• 


37 




22 




42 


. . . 


56 



(42) 



Preparatory^. 



Name. 

Ada Albrecht . 
Ella Brightman . 
Kate Bruce 
Alice Campbell . 
Edith Chapman 
Mabel Chapman 
Emma Henne . 
Ethel Hiss 
Vira Johnson 
Marion Mann . 
Madora Marsh, S. D. 
Isabel Preston . 
Grace Richardson 



Residence 

Miamisburg, Ohio 

New Bedford, Mass. 

Houlton, Maine 

Allston, Mass. 

Walla Walla, Washington 

Walla Walla, Washington 

Titusville, Penn. 

Cheswick Road, Aberdeen, Boston, Mass. 

Hallowell, Maine 



East Weymouth, Mass 



Glens Falls, N. Y. 



Muncie, Ind. 



Erie, Penn. 



Room. 
52 

4 

54 

55 

59 

59 
J. H. 



5 
49 

65 
70 

47 



(43) 



3n Qtletnomm. 



VIRGINIA ELLISON. 

Died, June 27, 1897. 



MRS. MARIE MEHLBACH DUFFY. 

Died, September 19, 1897. 




7-ekM<J^7tfU/'. 



3- D. 3odetY. 



Officers. 

President. 
CARITA L. CURTIS. 



Vice-President . 
M. ELISABETH HUNT. 



Secretary. 
GERTRUDE WATSON. 



MARITTA Y. SISSON. 



Executive Committee. 

JESSIE McCarthy. 



Treasurer. 
MABEL C. CURRIE. 



MYRTLE HEWSON. 



Critic. 
MADORA MARSH. 



Ushers. 



EVELYN EBERT. 



ELSIE BURDICK. 



Miss MARTHA E. RANSOM. 
Miss FLORENCE WELLS. 
Miss KATE ADAMS. 



Honorary Members. 
Miss FANNIE PRESTON. 
Miss ISABEL SHINN. 
Miss LOUISE PUTNAM. 



Mr. J. WALTER DAVIS. 
Mrs. frank DAVIDSON. 

Mrs. SUSAN JONES. 



Mrs. HELEN P. NEWMAN. 



Miss ALICE HOTCHKISS. 



(45) 



Aember>5 of tl)e 3. D. 5ociet>5. 



Elizabeth Allen. 
Frances Allen. 
Anna Ampt. 

Emma Aull. 

Elsie Burdick. 

Alice Burnham. 
Ada Cadmus. 
Carol Case. 

Elsie Clarke. 

Ella Cotton. 

Ruth Crouch. 

Mabel Currie. 
Carita Curtis. 

Caroline Cashing. 
Clara Davis. 

Evelyn Ebert. 

Carlotta Elling. 
Blanche Goll. 
Emma Goll. 



Edythe Grant. 

Laura Geohegan. 
Sophie Hall. 

Myrtle Hewson. 

Esther Hoover. 

Elizabeth Hunt. 
Eva Kennard. 
Jessie Kump. 

Mabel Marston. 

Jessie McCarthy. 
Madora Marsh. 

Genevieve Slayton. 
Emma Smith. 

Maritta Sisson. 

Ethelyn Prentice. 

Gertrude Watson. 
Anna Wells. 

Mary White. 

Virginia Wilson. 



(47) 



3- D. 5anq,Qet 



JUNE 4, 1897. 



Toastmistress 
President's Address 
Ninety-seven 

Poem 

Most Anything 
Lasellia . 
Farewell . 



LOYAL EN TOUT. 



Miss GOLL. 

Miss AMPT. 

Miss BURROUGHS. 

. Miss FAXON. 

. Miss LITTLE. 

Miss SHUMWAY. 

. Miss CURTIS. 



(48) 




■W M 



Dne.)ni.PhJl.n 



D)a5e(lia Clttb. 



Secretary. 
EVA FERRIS. 



Officers. 

President. 
MARTHA BAKER. 

Vice-President . 
MAUD MAYO. 



Business Manager. 
AVILA GRUBBS. 



Critic. 
KITTIEBEL CHAPMAN. 



ALMA WIDSTRAND. 



Executive Conwiittee. 
CAROLYN BALDWIN. 



ELIZABETH COSSAR. 



LAURA BIRDSEY. 



Guards. 
LORENA FELLOWS. 



MARY VANCE. 



Honorary Members. 



Miss MARY P. WITHERBEE. 
Mrs. BLANCHE C. MARTIN. 



Mr. JOSEPH A. HILLS. 
Mr. HERBERT L. RICH. 



Mr. RICHARD A. ANDREW. 



(49) 







^ 









^ 






'irl 








^f 



3? 



i ^. 



> 






Members of Lasellia CI«1). 



Helen Abbott. 

Klara Anderson. 

Emilia Anderson. 
Margaret Bailey. 
Martha Baker. 

Carolyn Baldwin. 
Ida Basch. 

Laura Birdsey. 

Elfleda Bond. 

Kittiebel Chapman. 
Alice Conant. 

Elizabeth Cossar. 
Nelle Daughenbaugh. 
May Emery. 

Lorena Fellows. 
Eva Ferris. 

Avila Grubbs. 
Alice Jenks. 

Mary Johnson. 



Alice Kimball. 

Edith Knight. 

Katharine Mason. 
Gertrude May. 
Maud Mayo. 

Josephine Milliken. 
Jennie Myrick. 

La Verne Reynolds. 

Ehzabeth Robertson. 
Nelle Robertson. 
Elise Scott. 

Elizabeth Starks. 
Marion Stafford. 

Katherine Tebbs. 
Mary Thomson. 

Caroline Thomson. 
Mary Vance. 

Frances Wood. 

Alma Widstrand. 



^50 



isa^eUia Ctob ^ii])])zr, 



JUNE 2, 1897. 



TOASTMISTRESS 



Miss Flora Ketcham. 



President's Welcome 



Miss Evva B. Cole. 



Response 



Miss Nora Burroughs. 



To Lighten Senior Burdens 



Miss Alice Kimball. 



Our Old Members 



Miss Ella Wilson. 



Saturday Night 



Miss Anne Warner. 



Student Life in Paris 



Mr. Andrew. 



An Unfolding 



Miss Ephra Vogelsang. 



(52) 



"Tt)ere Are Others." 



GAMMA EPSILON. 

Mabel C. Currie. 

Maritta Y. Sisson. 
Eliasbeth Hunt. 
Blanche Goll. 
Ella Cotton. 

Carita Curtis. 

T. B. Q. 

Maritta Y. Sisson. 

Mabel C. Currie. 
Elisabeth Hunt. 
Blanche Goll. 

K. C L. Q. 

Evelyn Ebert, 

Myrtle Hewson. 

EUsabeth Hunt. 
Jessie Kump. 

L. F. 

Mary Thomson. 

Caroline Thomson. 
May Emery. 

Elfleda Bond. 

Frances Wood. 



KAPPA KAPPA. 

Emma H. Goll. 

Kittiebel Chapman. 
Daisy Aull. 

N. N. T. 

Evelyn Ebert. 

Carol M. Case. 

Elisabeth Hunt. 

T. N. O. 

Maritta Sisson. 
Eva Ferris. 

Mabel C. Currie. 
Ella B. Cotton. 

Nelle Robertson. 
Bess Robertson. 

Elisabeth Hunt. 
Blanche Goll. 

T. T. T. 

Alice Kimball. 

Edith Knight. 

Alma Widstrand. 



(53) 



I^a^elt Leaver. 



Officers. 

President, ALICE KENDALL, '99. 
Vice-President, ALICE CONANT. Secretary, ELLA BRIGHTMAN, '01. 

Editor-in-Chief, CAROLINE THOMSON. 
Local Editor, EDITH MOULTON, '99. Exchange Editor, ELIZABETH STARKS. 

Associate Editors. 
LAURA BIRDSEY. MABEL COFFIN. FRANCES ALLEN, '99. 

Subscription Agent, La VERNE REYNOLDS. 

Business Manager, GRACE WASHBURN, '97. 

Assistant Business Manager, CAROL CASE, '99. 

(54) 



©aartette. 



Laura Geohegan. 



Edith Moulton. 



Bessie Cooke. 



Mary Thomson. 



Orpt)eQn Ctab. 



Mr. Davis 


Leader. 


Miss 


Wood .... Accompanist. 


isy L. Aull. 




L 


Blanche Goll. 


Martha A. Baker. 






Emma H. Goll. 


Emily A. Bissell. 






Marion W. Harrower. 


Carol Maude Case. 






Alice Jenks. 


Mabel A. Coffin. 






Alice A. Kimball. 


Alice P. Conant. 






Bessie VV. Legg. 


Bessie T. Cooke. 






Mabel C. Marston. 


Caroline E. Cushing. 






Edith T. Moulton. 


Clifford B. Dasher. 






Caroline B. Thomson. 


May W. Emery. 






Mary P. Thomson. 


Laura E. Geohegan. 




V. Irene Wellington 




Mary B. 


White. 





(55) 



dissemble. 



CLASS A. 

Helen Abbott. 
Martha Baker. 
Belle Bragdon. 
La Verne Reynolds. 



CLASS B. 

Alice Ashley. 
Prof. Hills. 
Ruth Kimball. 
Gertrude Watson. 



CLASS C. 

Alice Ashley. 
Evelyn Ebert. 
Edith Knight. 
Virginia Wilson. 



CLASS D. 

Laura Birdsey. 
Edna Cooke. 
Elisabeth Hunt. 
Frances Wood. 



CLASS E. 

Frances Allen. 
Nelle Daughenbaugh. 
Isabel Preston. 
Irene Wellington. 



Helen .Abbott. 
Emily Bissell. 
May Emery. 



Alice Ashley. 
AUce Conant. 
Alice Kimball. 



HARMONY. 
FIRST YEAR. 



Elizabeth Allen. 
Ada Cadmus. 
Caroline Thomson. 



Emma Aull. 
Clifford Dasher. 
Gertrude Watson. 



SECOND YEAR. 

Martha Baker. 
(56) 



La^^ell In^tfQ 




mental Cioh. 



Director 



Prof. Joseph A. Hills. 



Helen Abbott. 

Elizabeth Allen. 
Frances Allen. 

Klara Anderson. 
Alice Ashley. 

Margaret Bailey. 



Edna Cooke. 

Alice Conant. 

Mabel Currie. 

Margaret Dealey. 
Clifford Dasher. 
Evelyn Ebert. 



Madora Marsh. 

Jessie McCarthy. 

Katherine McCoy. 
Isabel Preston. 

La Verne Reynolds. 

Elizabeth Robertson. 



Carolyn Baldwin. 
Martha Baker. 
Ida Basch. 



Alice Bigelow. 



Laura Birdsey. 
Emily Bissell. 



Emilie Eliason. 
May Emery. 
Eva Ferris. 

Blanche Gardner. 
S. E. Goldstein. 



Bertha Granger. 



Nelle Robertson. 
Marion Saftbrd. 
Elise Scott. 

Bertha Sheldon. 

Marion Stafford. 

Caroline Thomson. 



Belle Bragdon. 

Ella Brightman. 



Ada Cadmus. 

Mabel Chapman. 
Elsie Clark. 

Mabel Coffin. 



Esther Hoover, 



Luella Houghton. 



Elisabeth Hunt. 

Ethel Johnson. 
Ruth Kimball. 

Edith Knight. 

Jeanne Le Royer. 



Catharine Tompkins. 
Gertrude Watson. 

Irene Wellington. 
Alma Widstrand. 



Virginia Wilson. 
Frances Wood. 



(57) 



31)al^e5peare Cla55. 



Lecturer 



Dr. W. J. RoLFE. 



Helen Abbott. 

Elizabeth Allen. 
Flora Allen, 

Frances Allen. 
Anna Ampt. 
Alice Ames. 

Emily Anderson. 
Emma Aull. 

Margaret Bailey. 
Martha Baker. 

Emily Bissell. 
Elsie Burdick. 

Alice Burnham. 
Ada Cadmus. 
Carol Case. 

Kittiebel Chapman. 
Emma Cleaves* 
Gertrude Confer. 
Edna Cooke. 

Ruth Crandall. 
Mabel Currie. 

Carita Curtis. 

Clifford Dasher. 



Nelle Daughenbaugh. 
Clara Davis. 

Helen Dyer. 

Evelyn Ebert. 
May Emery. 
Emma Goll. 

Rena Fellows. 

Blanche Gardner. 
Emeroy Ginn. 

Edythe Grant. 

Avila Grubbs. 
Sophie Hall. 

Myrtle Hewson. 

Luella Houghton. 

Grace Houghton. 
Elisabeth Hunt. 
Alice Jenks. 
Mary Johnson. 

Caroline Kendall. 
Alice Kendall. 

Eva Kennard. 

Alice Kimball. 

Ruth Kimball. 

(59) 



Edith Knight. 

Mabel Marston. 

Katherine Mason. 
Maud Mayo. 

Ruth Merriam. 
Josephine Milliken. 
Edith Moulton. 
Jane Myrick. 

La Verne Reynolds. 
Helen Rishell. 
Ruth Rishell. 
Elise Scott. 

Maritta Sisson. 
Emma Smith. 

Margaret Tarr. 

Caroline Thomson. 
Mary Thomson. 
Katherine Tebbs. 
Mary Vance. 

Virginia Wilson. 
Anna Willis. 

Frances Wood. 



lya^ell Canoe Clal). 



Captain, Martha E. Ransom. 



President, Emma H. Goll. 



Secretary, Anna R. Ampt. 



Treasurer, Eva Ferris. 



Elizabeth C. Allen. 



Anna R. Ampt. 



Mabel C. Currie. 
Eva L. Ferris. 



Martha A. Baker. 



Emma H. Goll. 



Ada Cadmus. 



Alice Kimball. 



Kittiebel Chapman. 



Maud Mayo. 



(61) 



i^i55ionar^ Oociet^. 



President. 
LUELLA HOUGHTON. 

Vice-President. 
GERTRUDE TAGGART. 



Recording Secretary. 
RUTH MERRIAM. 



Corresponding Secretary. 
CLIFFORD DASHER. 



Treasurer. 
ALICE BURNHAM. 



Executive Committee. 
MISS PACKARD. CLARA DAVIS. 

EDYTHE GRANT. 



(62) 



christian Endeav^or. 



PRESIDENT. 

CAROLINE THOMSON. 



SECRETARY. 

ELFLEDA BOND. 



VICE-PRESIDENT. 

ANNIE IVES. 



TREASURER. 

EMMA SMITH. 



LUELLA HOUGHTON. 



LOOK-OUT COMMITTEE. 



MARY THOMSON. 



ELIZABETH STARKS. 



PRAYER-MEETING COMMITTEE. 



RUTH KIMBALL, 



SOCIAL COMMirrEE. 



TOSEPHINE MILLIKEN. 



AVILA GRUBBS. 



(63) 






Capt. ELISE E. SCOTT, 



Capt. ALICE A KIMBALL. 



Capt. EMMA H. GOLL 



Drill 



OFFICERS OF COMPANY A. 

Captain, ELISE E. SCOTT. Lieutenant, LUELLA HOUGHTON. 

SERGEANTS. 
First, IDA F. TROWBRIDGE. Second, CARITA L. CURTIS. Third, LA VERNE REYNOLDS. 

OFFICERS OF COMPANY B. 

Captain, ALICE A. KIMBALL. Lieutenant, DAISY L. AULL. 

SERGEANTS. 
First, ELIZABETH C. ALLEN. Second, GERTRUDE S. WATSON. Third, EDITH F. MOULTON. 

OFFICERS OF COMPANY C. 

Captain, EMMA H. GOLL. Lieutenant, EDYTHE T. GRANT. 

SERGEANTS. 
First, CAROL M. CASE. Second, MARGARET BAILEY. Third, MARTHA A. BAKER. 

(65) 



Laura Birdsey. 
Katherine Bruce. 
Elsie Burdick. 
Grace Houghton. 
Mary Houghton. 
Eva Kennard. 



Mabel Chapman. 
Isabella Clemens. 
Mabel Coffin. 
Madora Marsh. 
Margaret McGavic 
Helen Ramsdell 



Gertrude Vreeland. 



PRIVATES OF COMPANY A. 

Edna Cooke. 
Ella Cotton. 
Mary Davies. 
Elizabeth Robertson. 
Bertha Sheldon. 
Maritta Sisson. 
Alma Widstrand. 



Evelyn Ebert. 
Emeroy Ginn. 
Esther Hoover. 
Genevieve Slayton. 
Louise Thatcher. 
Catharine Tompkins. 
Virginia Wilson. 



PRIVATES OF COMPANY B. 



Ida Basch. 
Alice Bigelow. 
Elsie Clark. 
Carolyn Kendall. 
Bessie Legg. 

Jessie McCarthy. 



Alice Conant. 
Gertrude Confer. 
Abbie Congdon. 
Katherine Tebbs. 
Irene Thomas. 

Caroline Thomson. 



Caroline Gushing. 
Alice Campbell. 
Lorena Fellows. 
Mary Thomson. 
Mary Thomas. 
Mary Vance. 



Blanche Gardner. 
Arminta Henne. 
Emma Henne. 
Anna Wells. 
Anna Willis. 

Marion Harrower. 



Elizabeth Allen. 
Emily Bissell. 

Ehzabeth Cossar. 
Alice Jenks. 

Ethel Johnson. 



PRIVATES OF COMPANY C. 

Carita Curtis. 

Carlotta EUing. 
Eva Ferris. 



Laura Geohegan. 

I. Blanche Goll. 
Avila Grubbs. 
Katharine Mason. 

Nelle Robertson. 



(66) 



atadio. 



ANNA AMPT. 



MAUD MAYO. 



EMILY ANDERSON. 



LUELLA HOUGHTON. 



GERTRUDE VREELAND. 



ALMA WIDSTRAND. 



lONE TUCKER. 



ANNA WILLIS. 



ALICE KENDALL. 



CAROLINE KENDALL. 



EDITH CHAPMAN. 



RUTH CROUCH. 



(67, 





<p=s-?^ 



^ 






^T~7*=^ 







Cool^ing Cta55e5. 



Emily Andersen. 
Mabel Currie. 



Edythe Grant. 



PRIVATE, 
Ada Cadmus. 
Clara Davis. 



Mabet, Coffin. 
Millie Eliason. 



Elizabeth Robertson. 



Anna Ampt. 
KiTTiEBEL Chapman. 
Caroline Kendall. 

Jane Myrick. 



3d year. 
Daisy Aull. 
May Emery. 
Kathekine Mason. 



Alice Burnham. 
LuELLA Houghton. 
Maude Mayo. 



Ida Trowbridge. 



Helen Abbott. 
Emily Bissell. 
Ruth Crandall. 
Eva Ferris. 
Ethel Johnson. 
Josephine Milliken. 
Nelle Robertson. 
Gertrude Watson, 



2d year. 
Elizabeth Allen. 
Ella Brightman. 
Carita Curtis. 
Laura Geohegan. 
Mary Johnson. 
Edith Moulton. 
Elise Scott. 
Irene Wellington. 



Margaret Bailey. 
Carol Case. 
Clifford Dasher. 
Sophie Hall. 
Mabel Marston. 
Elsie Reynolds. 
Mary Thomas. 
Mary White. 



(69) 



Oratory 



Kittiebel Chapman. 



Edna Cooke. 



Emilie Eliason. 



Emeroy Ginn. 



Mildred Harvey. 



Arminta Henna. 



Ethel Johnson. 



Vira Johnson. 



Alice Kendall. 



Alice Moore. 



Helen Rishell. 



Elizabeth Robertson. 



Bertha Sheldon. 



Katherine Tebbs. 



Ida Trowbridge. 



Mary Vance. 



Irene Wellington. 



(70) 



^viiDiDing Papils. 



ADA ALBRECHT. 

FRANCES ALLEN. 

ALICE BURNHAM. 

EDITH CHAPMAN. 
MABEL CHAPMAN. 

ALICE CONANT. 

MARY DAVIES. 

LORENA FELLOWS. 
BLANCHE GARDNER. 

AVILA GRUBBS. 

MARION HARROWER. 

MILDRED HARVEY. 
ARMINTA HENNE. 

EMMA HENNE. 

ESTHER HOOVER. 



MARY HOUGHTON. 

GRACE HOUGHTON. 

VIRA JOHNSON. 

CAROLINE KENDALL 
MARION MANN. 

MADORA MARSH. 

JESSIE McCarthy. 

ALICE MOORE. 
ELIZABETH ROBERTSON. 
MARITTA SISSON. 

KATHERINE TEBBS. 

LOUISE THATCHER. 
CATHERINE TOMPKINS. 

FRANCES WOOD. 



Dre5S Catting. 



EMMA HENNE. 

MARY THOMAS. 



ALMA WIDSTRAND. 

FRANCES WOOD. 



(70 



Ba^I^et Ball Teams. 



'98. 

A. A. Kimball (Captain) 

E. GOLL 

R. Kimball 
S. Hall . 
A. Ampt 
E. Allen 
E. Aull 

Substitiites. 
Cadmus. Emery. 

Mayo. 



C. Elling . 

M. Tarr I 

E. Ferris (Captain) j 

K. Tebbs 

McGavic . 

E. Henne I 

N. Robertson J 

M. Davies. 



Centre 

Centre Guards 

Goal Defender 
Goal Thrower 

Goal Guards . 



^pecial^. 



Substitutes. 
L. Birds EY. 

(73) 



'99. 

C. Curtis 

N. Daughenbaugh 

E. Scott 

C. Case 

E. Hunt (Captain) 

E. Moulton 

M. CURRIE 



Substitutes. 

G. Ebert. a. Kendall. 

M. Bailey. Bissell. 
M. Vance. 



Centre 

Centre Guards 

Goal Defender 
Goal Thrower 

Goal Guards 



A. Campbell. 



Commencement Weel^. 

JUNE 3-9, 1897. 



COMMENCEMENT CONCERT . 



Thursday, June 3. 



BACCALAUREATE SERMON 



Rev. C. M. SOUTHGATE. 



Sunday, June 6. 



CLASS DAY 



• ■ 



Monday, June 7. 



SENIOR RECEPTION 



Tuesday, June 8. 



COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 



Wednesday, June 9. 



COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS. 

Rev. R. S. MacARTHUR. 



ALUMNA RECEPTION 



(74) 



Wednesday Afternoon. 



La^elt Cta^5 nigl)t 



JUNE 7, 1897. 



CLASS SONG. 



President's Address 



Introduction 



An Oi-ympian Tea Party 



Song 



Class Prophecy 

Forget-us-not 

Presentation 

GOOD-BY 



Miss Nora Burroughs. 



Miss Myrtle Davis. 



Miss Annie Young. 



Words by Miss Emeline Carlyle. 

Miss Gertrude Jones. 

Miss Gertrude Clarke. 

Miss Lena Evans. 



Miss Anna Warner. 



Oration 



OUT-DOOR EXERCISES. 



Miss Edith Blair. 



Sacrifice to Minerva 



Miss Grace Washburn. 



(75) 



TI)e 3^nior Propf)eCY- 



5;-^ WAS just before the New Year came, 
Y A cold December night, 

The dying fire upon the hearth 
Gave faint and weird light. 



II. 

It was vacation ; all had left 
For homes both far and near, 

Alone I stayed to ponder o'er 
The past, the coming year. 



III. 
My thoughts they wandered on and on 

To all the girls so dear, 
Whose Senior pictures on her walls 

Lasell hangs year by year. 



(76) 



IV. 

But soon I felt a numbness strange 
Creep through each nerve and vein ; 

I saw queer lights and figures, which 
I ne'er shall see again. 



V. 

Approaching me there came two forms, 

A man who feebly bent ; 
With him a woman in whose face 

Were good and evil blent. 



VI. 

"We are Time and Fate," they said to me, 

In queer and ghostly tones, 
Sending an icy chill e'en to 

The marrow of my bones. 



VII. 

" We willingly will tell to you 
All you have wished to hear, — 

The haps of those who 've left Lasell — 
Nay, shrink not so, nor fear!" 



VIII. 

I answered, weak and trembling, 
" Oh, tell me. Time and Fate, 

What joys and woes the future years 
Shall bring to 'Ninety-Eight.'" 

(77) 



IX. 

" If you wish it," they made answer. 

I named the Seniors all. 
" We '11 tell you now the fortunes of 

The president, Emma Goll. 



X. 

" She '11 hie away when summer comes, 
To home out in the West ; 

There shall she sway the social court, 
With winning graces blest. 



XI. 

" The Daisy, I am sad to say, 

Will never find a mate. 
Not though she look around the world. 

From early until late. 



XII. 

" Devoted still, each unto each, 
Shall Jane and Ada be. 

Drinking, in Old Maid's Paradise, 
Their cups of Old Maid's tea. 

(78) 



XIII. 

" In dress reform shall Jane engage, 
While Ada rice shall cook, 

For this, she vows, she much prefers 
To poring o'er a book. 



XIV. 

" Clifford will soon, for good or ill, 
Give up the name she 's carried ; 

The bride of '98 she'll be, 
When to her lawyer married. 



XV. 
" Ruth Merriam takes ship e'er long 

To heathen o'er the sea ; 
Your Alice K. the little folk 

Will train full cheerily. 

XVI. 

" Should you desire your photograph. 
To Houghton's Studio hie ; 

She '11 give good rates, and likewise put 
An ad. in the Allerlei. 

(79) 



XVII. 

"The editor, Kittiebel's bound to be, 
Of ' The Boston Brown Baked Beans,' 

Write lovely things, give high commands, 
And boom her magazine. 



XVIII. 
" Now Anna A. and Clara D. 

Will do — well, who can say .'' 
But there are two in the Buckeye State 
Will tell you all some day. 



XIX. 
" A life well spent for others' good 

Will Milla gladly give, 
Healing the lame, the halt, the blind, 

And helping others live. 



XX. 

"Paderewski now his fame must guard, 
Lest Martha filch 't away ; 

Sonata, Minuet, and Nocturne 
Will set her first some day. 

180) 



XXI. 

" To future classes, Thursday eves, 

Will Sophie proudly tell 
The fine points of her lecture on 

'The Advantages of Lasell.' 



XXII. 

" The Herculean Lady, all 

The papers soon shall puff ; 
And that will be your strong girl, Maud, 

Who '11 glory gain enough. 



XXIII. 
" Ruth C. to charitv's sweet work 

Will give her life, 't is said, 
And poor folk from their depths of woe 

Shower blessings on her head. 



XXIV. 

" Your ' Al.' has always longed to be 
A Carpenter — don't laugh ; 

She'll join in partnership with one 

To be his better half. 



(8i) 



XXV. 

" Virginia's time and strength have gone 

To help her favorite book, 
Upon whose store of garnered wit 

I trust you all may look. 



XXVI. 
"In path her famous grandsire 

Treads Emma S. to-day, 
She 'II dash you off a clever song, 

Nor will a whit delay. 



XXVII. 
" Sweet harmony May E. will teach, 

Whose pupils sure will say, 
' Since I can ne 'er her ideal reach, 

Would I were dead to-day.' 



XXVIII. 

" From * classic halls ' shall Mary go 
To her Manchester home. 

Where callers seventy times a week — 
And oftener, p'rhaps — will come. 

r82) 



XXIX. 

" Joe Jefferson did Caroline hear, 

As you are well aware ; 
Now list : she '11 be an actress soon 

And play at Castle Square. 



XXX. 

" Ruth her cap and gown will doff, 
To don the gray and white, 

And convent's bleak and gloomy walls 
Shall hide her from your sight. 



XXXI. 

" Helen, Elizabeth, and Ed " — 

But here the clock struck one, 
And Time and Fate did vanish quite, 

Though leaving still undone 
The work they'd promised they would do, 

The tale they said they 'd tell. 

The mystic cloud round '98 entirely to dispel. 

XXXII. 

But what they told I 've told to you. 

And more I could not do ; 
You '11 have to wait and see now if 
'Their prophecy was true. 

(83) 



Senior vStatistic^. 



NAME. 


Nickname. 


Distinguished 
for 


Lacks 


Highest 
Ambition. 


In love with 


Pet 

Expression. 


Always 


Future Fate. 


Snpe. 


Abbott . 






Letter writing. 


Cordiality. 


6 




ID 
(f) 

M 



h 


A tanner. 


I'm so tickled. 


With books. 


Tanner's wife. 


Jenks. 


Allen . . 




Lizzie. 


Spooning. 


Age. 


The older boys 
at home. 


Just got up. 


Acting 
the baby. 


Will be wiser 
in time. 


Currie. 


Ampt . . 




Tood. 


Beauty. 


Spunk. 


Red hair. 


No! 


In the Studio. 


An artist. 


Hewson. 


Anderson 




Miller. 


Her sister. 


Individ- 
uality. 


English. 


I told you so. 


In Room 4. 


A trained nurse. 


Bailey. 


Aull . . 




Daisy. 


Her conceit. 


Admirers. 


Herself. 


— — 


Primijing. ' An old maid. 


Case. 


Baker . . 




Mattie. 


Music. 


Time. 


Symphonies. 


Have to 
practise. 


Busy. 


Missionary. 


Geohegan. 


Burnham 




Al. 


Affability. 


Height. 


Billie. 


Hello ! 


Happy. 


Some one's 
darling. 


Sisson. 


Cadmus . 




Ader. 


Good definitions. 


Manners. 


.Jane. 


You know. 


Giving her 
opinions. 


A cook. 


Marston. 


Chapman 




Kit. 


Energy. 


Dignit}'. 


"Hal." 


Ye-us. 


Talking. 


A Cherry Sister. 


Mason. 


Crandall . 






Her brother. 


A nickname. 


Torrey. 


Perfectly 
dandy. 


Generous. 


Philanthropist. 


R. Rishell. 


Dasher . 




Cliff. 


Her 

small brother. 


Several 
things. 


Won't tell 
whom. 


Goodness 
gracious! 


In practice 
rooms. 


A housewife. 


Grubbs. 


Davis . . 




Cad. 


Her 

graphophone. 


2d year 
cooking. 


Science. 


— — 


In laboratory. 


AnM.D. 


Bissell. 


Emery . 




Mazie. 


Preference 
for Yale. 


Right 
to vote. 


Elfleda. 


Oh ! ha, ha ! 


Going home. 


An orchestra 
accompanist. 




Goll . . 




Ben. 


Numerous 
high offices. 


Pull (?). 


All the comforts 
of home. 


I presume so. 


Engaged. 


A thoroughbred. 


Curtis. 


Grant . . 




Torrey. 


Gentle 
disposition. 


Blanche. 


Evelyn. 


— — 


Grinding. 


Queen of 
a household. 


Hunt. 


Hall . . 




Soph. 


Abruptness. 


Popularity. 


Waban. 


Say! 


Bragging. 


A professional 
athlete. 


Watson. 


Houghton 




Lueller. 


Quietness. 


Go. 


Ruth. 




The same. 


Sunday school 
teacher. 




Johnson . 






Brightness. 


Callers (?). 


Harvard. 


Gee! 


Tired. 


To live 
in St. Loiiis. 


Miliken. 


Kendall . 




Kerosene. 


Smile. 


Spirit. 


Madora. 


My dear. 


Good. 


To be a wee bit 
wicked. 


Moulton. 


Kimball . 




Kimball A. 


Rushing. 


Apijetite. 


Edith. 


Edith. 


In 42. 


To visit Edith. 


Allen. 


Kimball . 






New sealskin. 


Prominence. 


Her room-mate. 


Listen. 


Chez elle. 


With the Parish. 


Scott. 


Mayo . . 




Mud. 


Her physical 
strength. 


Knowledge. 


A man. 


How fine. 


Worried. 


An alumna. 


Fellows. 


Merriam . 






Missionary 
work. 


Fun. 


The other Ruth. 


Oh, dear ! 


On time. 


To be good. 


Vance. 


Myrick . 




Jen. 


Pompadour. 


Daisy. 


The quartette. 


Perfectly 
miserable. 


Telephoning 
to Daisy A. 


A. great 
mathematician. 


Daughen- 
baugh. 


Smith . . 




Em. 


Grandfather. 


Ease of 
mind. 


Her class. 


Well. 


Doing Livy. 


A student. 


Burdick. 


Wilson . 




Pivot. 


Swiftness. 


Old girls. 


Her brother. 


Ha! ha! 


Good natured. Professional 
joker. 


Ebert. 



(84) 



LELAND T. POWERS, 

America's Greatest Impersonator, 

WILL GIVE A NEW PROGRAMME, 

LORD CHUMLEY, 



AT 



LASELL SEMINARY, 



ON 

Saturday, November 20, 

AT 8 RM. 

UNDER THE AUSPICES OF 

Thk Sknior Class. 

(85) 



Nursery Rhymes of Lasell^ with Apologies to Mother Goose* 



Bye, Freshman, baby ; 
You '11 be a Senior, may be, 
And wear the cap and gown, 
The evidence of renown. 



I want to buy a brand-new gown. 
Which is the way to Boston town? 
One car up, another car down. 
That is the way to Boston town. 



Come when the bell rings, 
Do what you 're told. 

Don't speak in chapel. 
Or some one will scold. 

March as though sailing, 
Hold up your head. 

Keep time to the music, 
By the Seniors you 're led. 



My chum Rosalind and I fell out, 

And what do you think 'twas all about? 

She loved Jack, and Jack loved me, 

So that 's what caused the trouble, you see. 



(86) 










:^K^ 



Tf)e (il)a5tl^ (jfjosts. 




I. 

OME days before All Hallowe'en, 
A poster in the hall 
Invited each and every one 

To a sheet and pillow-case ball. 



II. 

And when the hour at last had struck, 
A queer procession formed. 

Of ghosts of every rank and class. 
Grotesque, angelic, horned. 



III. 

Our hosts, the Seniors, pinned on some 

Small cards which bore a name. 
Tali Melba walked with Santa Claus ; 

Our Principal with Hall Caine. 

IV. 

In dim, weird light that flared and fell, 

The "gym" received us all; 
And a hurdy-gurdy's mournful notes 

Did fill that festal hall. 

V. 

Dim shapes of dread in corners dark. 
The flickering shadows screened ; 

And when those ghastly guests moved round, 
It was as if one dreamed. 

(88) 



VI. 

A Jack O'Lantern gave them light, 

As round the hall they sped 
In twos and fours, — oh, round and round 

By a Senior and Junior led ! 

VII. 

And then the signal came, " Unmask." 
What laughter and surprise ! 

For almost all who thronged the hall, 
We 'd failed to recognize. 



VIII. 

A box of pop-corn tempting stood. 
With apples red and sweet, 

For all who after dance or play 
Might care to stop and eat. 



IX. 

With chestnuts roasted, apples bobbed, 

Were many fortunes tried. 
Poor maids ! Some found their true loves false ; 

They wrung their hands and cried. 

X. 

Oh, how we danced ! The moments flew. 

It could not be so late ! 
We said good-night, with three good cheers 

For the ghosts of '98. 



C89) 



A. W's To 5e. 



I. 



CLIFFORD DASHER. 



II. 
EMMA H. GOLL. 



III. 
KITTIEBEL CHAPMAN. 



IV. 

LOUISE THATCHER. 



V. 
MARY THOMSON. 



VI. 
ALICE BURNHAM. 



VII. 

MARY JOHNSON. 



VIII. 
EVA L. KENNARD. 



IX. 



ELISABETH ROBERTSON. (?) 



X. 



ADA CADMUS. (?) 



(90 



2. Lasellia banquet. 

3. Commencement concert. 

4. S. D. Society banquet. 
6. Baccalaureate Sunday, 
7 Class Day. 

8. Senior reception. 

9. Commencement Day. 
10. Tears and promises. 



(92) 



September. 

14. Arrival of new girls. 

15. New girls classified. 

16. Return of old girls. 

18. Reception for new girls. 

19. Sacred concert. 

20. Bunker Hill excursion. 

27. Excursion to Concord. 

28. Tears and sighs for home. 



(93) 



October. 

1. AUerlei Board elected. 

2. White Mountain trip. 
4. Excursion to Newport. 
6. First Allerlei Meeting. 

9. German given by Lasell Canoe Club. 

II. Party to see Joseph Jefiferson. 

14. Second party to see Jefferson. 

24. Sacred concert. 

28. Miss Potter's lecture. 

30. Hallowe'en party. 



(94) 



f/ouember. 

1. Salem excursion. 

Trouble over walking hours. Resolve to begin again. 

2. Dr. Gallagher began his duties. 
Drill began. 

6. Hay-ride. 

10. Great excitement over Yale-Harvard game. 

11. Lecture on "Climbing the Matterhorn." 

12. Rossa's Band. 

15. Lecture on Mexico. 

16. Voted on length of Christmas vacation. 
18. Lecture on Mexico. 

20. Leland Powers in " Lord Chumley." 
22. Lecture on Mexico. 
25. Thanksgiving. 

28. Sacred concert. 

29. Exciting Junior Class meeting. 



(95 ) 



Dece/T^ber. 

2. Great surprise: Seniors appear in caps and gowns. 

Mr. Dunham's concert. 
6. Mr. Bragdon's request in chapel for AUerlei news. 

1 1 . Mass meeting : Girls resolve to wear short skirts. 

12. Church service in chapel. 

14. Trunks brought down. 

15. Rash promises to write. 



(96) 



Ja[jdjary. 



4 



Some few girls returned. 



5. Chapel at 12.10. 

6. Lecture on " American Voice," 

8. Dartmouth Glee and Mandolin clubs. 

II. " Kittie " made honorary member of Dartmouth Glee Club. 

13. Trip to Rescue Mission. 

15. Great noise in hospital. 

20. Lecture on Concord. 

27. Day of prayer. 

28. No more punging. 
Ride to Cambridge. 

29. Junior reception. 



C97) 



pebraary. 

4. Lasellia entertainment for S. D.'s. 

7-12. Color lectures every evening. 

10. Juniors beat Seniors in Basket Ball. 

14. Junior Class picture, 

17. Trip to Art Exhibition. 

19. Miss Benfey's recital. 

20. Miss Benfey read in chapel. 

21. Great excitement over war news. 

22. Voluntary offers of aid to the prospective victims of the coming war. 
Washington Dinner. 

Exercises in chapel. 

23. Second Lecture on Gothic Architecture. 



(98) 



/T)arcl?. 

2. Saw Modjeska in Mary Stuart. 

3. Mrs. Downs' lecture. 

5. Aunt Jemima's Album, given by Missionary Society 

9. Lasell Instrumental Club's entertainment. 

10. Lecture on Architecture. 

12. Canoe Club's picnic in the gymnasium. 

16. Senior Table formed. 

17. Dr. Kendig's lecture, "Myself." 

19. Song Recital, by Miss Villa Whitney White. 

20. Missionary from Japan spoke to us. 

24. Lecture on Canterbury Cathedral. 

25. Music in Chapel. 

26. Heard Thomas' Orchestra, and Josef Hofmann. 
28. Second party to hear Josef Hofmann. 

30. Mrs. Down's last lecture, on Westminster Abbey. 

31. Pupils' Musical Rehearsal. 



(99) 



Tf)e Masq^aerade. 




honor of our Washington, 

Who helped this land to save, 
The Seniors a great masquerade 
On the Twenty-Second gave. 



When music sweet from lighted gym 
Gave forth its welcomed call, 

The merry bands, from different lands, 
Came merrily, one and all. 



You ne'er could tell a one of them, 

Disguised so well were they ; 
But when the masks were taken off, 

" I knew you," all would say. 

It would have done you good to see 

How many men were there, 
And how on these sweet looks were show'red 

By all the damsels fair. 

A youth from sunny Mexico, 
A soldier, Jap, and clown; 

The Queen of Wight, a ballet girl. 
A courtier of renown. 

(lOO) 



From the sunny South a darky band 
Had come to " nigger heaven " ; 

They sported round, but found most fun 
In " seven come eleven." 



Back from the good old times of yore 
A couple quaint had come ; 

They must have danced the minuet 
In the days of Washington. 



From Lillian Russell's company 
A queen of clubs was seen ; 

A violet from a mossy dell 
Next came with smilax green. 



The jester of a kingly court 
With the maid of the regiment, 

The golf girl, and the tennis youth, 
Were there on pleasure bent. 



And how they joined in all the fun, 

From first until the last, 
Remembering the Senior Ball 

Long after it was past. 



(101) 



Lasell Seminary, 

auburndale, mass. 



Miss Ida Benfey 

e^ ^ The American Slory Teller 

.... WILL GIVE A . . . . 

DRAMATIC RECITAL OF AN HO UR, 

Followed by a Half Hour of Comedy. 
UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE S. D. SOCIETY. 

r ^ — " — 

%^ *^ *^ 

Admission, Seventy-five Cents. 

February, the 1 9th, *9Z, 
At Eight O'clock. 



(102) 



A Ivd^ell dradaate. 



1 



I. 

^HOSE sweet, sad eyes ! 

Far in their depths her white soul Hes 

So white, the pure rays shining thro' 

Have changed their darkness to velvet blue. 



II. 

That tender mouth ! 

Like petals of a blush rose from the South, 
That lies within a snowbank's icy hold, — 
Blushing the sweeter, that its heart is cold. 



III. 

'T was thus I thought last night; but now 
I'm cold as any abbot. 
The reason why ? She was not taught 
To make a good " Welsh Rarebit. " 



CI03) 



SLEEPING. 



DON'T KNOCK OR CALL. 



Encfased — Please Call Acfain, 



For EVERY ONE. 



K:E>BJr» OUT. 



(104) 



5ooI^ Reviews. 



BOOK. 


AUTHOR. 


EDITOR'S REMARK. 


Why I Became an Auctioneer .... 


K. Ch-pm-n 


Actual experiences — vivid and dramatic. 


Dante's Paradise Lost 


E. K-nn-rd 


Strikingly compared with Milton's Inferno. 


Kentucky Horses and Men . ... 


K. T-bb- . 


The author is an enthusiastic Southerner, and has 
her subjects well in hand. 


The Beauty of My Own Room as Seen in One Day, 


M. S-ss-n . 


Shows keen observation. 


An Evening in a Railroad Station .... 


E. H. G-11 


A simple love story. 


The Topography of Boston ; the Quickest Way to 
Get There 


L B. G-11 . 


All short cuts well explained. 


The Advantage of a Low, Sweet Voice . 


A. C-dm-s 


A pathetic tale of personal experiences. 


The Newspaper of To-day, and How to Read It . 


L. Th-tch-r 


Especially adapted to the school girl's use. 


How and When to Make Promises 


C. D-sh-r . 


Good advice, as how to keep them. 


My Faithful Butler 


E. H-nt . 


A tragedy in four acts. 


Getting Ads. ; and How to Do It . 


A. Gr-bb- . 


Advantages of being a clear-headed business woman. 


A Ruined Life ; or, Breakfast at Seven 


C. A-d-rson 


A clear and logical discussion of the evils of so 
doing. 


Treatise on Latest Doctrines of the Calvinists 


E. F-rr-s . 


Procrastination or Predestination — which ? 


How to Grow Fat in Two Weeks .... 


E. Eb-rt . 


The author invites personal correspondence. 


A Fine Collection of College Flags 


M. C-rr-e . 


The secret of winning them. 


The Age of Chivalry is Not Yet Gone . 


E. C-tt-n . 


Some women still have true, loyal Knights. 


Hebrides as Floating Islands . _ . 


E. A-11 


Their wonderful course from Northern Atlantic to 
Southern Pacific. 


Remembrance of My Visit to the Puck Building . 


C. C-se 


The author's remembrances seem Payneful (?). 


" My Hon. Stirling Peter " 


C. C-rt-s . 


Sequel to Hon. Peter Stirling. 


How and When to Mind Your Own Business 


Compiled by several 
authors . 


Published especially for the use of the Class of "98. 



(105) 



Tf)e I<)0(IaI^ Fiend, 



^^^ILMS — films — films — oh, films, 
y^ For my Kodak give, I pray ! " 

But, chill as the icy winter wind, 
Comes the answer, " None to-day. 



1^ 

IP 



Oh, woe to that filmless friend, 

If she laugh in heartless mirth 
O'er a grief so sore ! Doth she dare ignore 

That the camera-fiend owns the earth? 



"I had; I used; I've not; 

My roll hath reached its end. 
Go, ye, and visit the village store. 
And buy for yourself, my friend." 



Ah ! her punishment dire shall be 
To languish in filmless shades. 

Where never a blue-print shall delight 
The eyes of such hapless maids. 



(io6) 



The Sorrowful Ballad of the Wretched Visitor; 

Or, That All who Read may Run. 



Now listen to this story sad 
Which I '11 to you relate : 

It is about a visitor 
And her pathetic fate. 



To chapel she one night did go, — 

That fatal night in May ; 
The thought, it fills my eyes with tears, 

Alas ! O, lack-a-day ! 



The girls came in with eyes cast down ; 

They looked both meek and mild. 
One heard no whisper in that room, 

And not a person smiled. 



The service o'er, the girls went out ; 

The visitor went too : 
She wished to see those dear, nice girls, 

Who seemed so good and true. 



But suddenly there was a rush. 

The visitor looked round ; 
But ere she could a thing descry 

Her feet were off the ground, 



And she was pulled, and pushed along. 
And knocked, and shoved, and jammed ; 

And pinched, and thumped, and dragged, and hurled, 
And jerked, and thrust, and slammed. 



Now full against the wall she bumped. 

And now pitched forward straight ; 
Then slowly backward pressed again, 

And whacked upon her pate. 

Her dress was torn, her hair pulled down ; 

She could not get her breath. 
And thus the wretched visitor 

Was hurried to her death. 



A hundred angry voices rang 

Through her bedeafened ears, — 

Such dreadful shouts, such clamor fierce, 
They filled her soul with fears. 

Now, hark ye to the moral true 

Of this pathetic tale : 
Dear reader, keep ten miles away 

When we girls get our mail. 



(107) 



(i055ip. 



Peanuts. 

Crackers. 

Cherry Sisters. 

Going punging ? 

Got any films ? 

Lucky Dog Jack. 

Let 's play engine, Edythe. 

Is your pouch done ? 

Where are those short skirts ? 

Going to Yale-Harvard game ? 

Color lectures: Blue, wisdom ; Red, love. 

Who does not know how to jolly ? 

Girls! Allerlei meeting. Come at once to 35. 

Have you heard Miss K. Chapman lecture ? 

Have you memorized your eighty pages of French ? 

Oh ! think of something cute for the Allerlei. 

(108) 



ANNUAL ENTERTAINMENT 



GIVEN BY THE 



LASKLLIA CLUB 



^* C^^ 8^^ ^^ ^?^ 



DartmouLth Glee Club. 



^* ^* e^^ fi^'^ fi^* 

January 8, 1898, 

At 7.45 P. NI. 

TICKETS ----_.. 75 Cents. 

(109) 



Clas^ sSoncT. 



I. 

Now here we all stand fast, 

A really model class, 

To give three cheers for dear Lasell, 

Our Alma Mater loved so well. 

We Juniors, as you see, 

Lack Senior dignity ; 

Yet when we get a cap and gown. 

You '11 see the Freshies bowing down. 

Chorus. 
Three times ten 

Times three plus nine ! 

We're the class of ninety-nine ! 

Lasell, Lasell ! the blue, the blue ! 

We sing her praises, ever new. 

And now before this night we part 

Let's join once more with swelling heart 

In — three times ten times three plus nine 

Lasell, Lasell ! and ninety-nine ! 

IL 

And when at last we go 

More of this world to know, 

We '11 keep as treasures ever dear 

The memories of pleasures here ; 

Of Faculty so kind, 

Best friends of ninety-nine; 

Of work and play, and those we 've met. 

Whom we can never more forget. 

Chorus. 

(no) 



3even Wonder^ of I^asell. 



I. The '99 AUerlei. 

II. The Senior Enterprise. 

III. Sophomores' attentions to Juniors. 

IV. Freshman meetings. 

V. Prep, brains. 

VI. A hard working special. 
VII. Lewis — the watchman. 



(Ill) 



Presl)man. 



1. Be sure to ask questions about everything you don't know. 

2. Be sure to be late for breakfast. 

3. Be sure to cut chapel three times a week. 

4. Be sure to visit all towns in the vicinity; this may be your last chance. 

5. Be sure to read your mail in chapel; your best opportunity. 

6. Be sure to snub Seniors ; they need it. 

7. Be sure to shirk work; it's good for you. 

8. Be sure to go to everything that comes along; you might m.iss something. 

9. Be sure to buy candy; good for the constitution. 

10. Be sure to think you are the only one; there are none like you. 



(112) 



Tf)e R^esttlt of a Reverie, 



A clerk bent over his ledger ; 

A smile played over his face 
As he thought of a girl at the seashore, 

A girl so full of grace. 

And his eyes were glued to the ceiling, 
And his pen dropped down to the floor, 

As he dreamed of the summer vacation. 
And wished he could live it o'er. 

But the manager "collared" that fellow. 
And the smile fled away from his face ; 

And he 's sorry he e'er met the maiden, 
For now he is "hunting a place." 

"And what of the girl," do you ask me? 

Oh, she hasted back to Lasell, 
When Father Time rang in September 

On his heart-breakmg, iron-tongued bell. 

And now she is doing her penance. 
In backwork of Science and Greek ; 

Of French, Analytic, and Cooking, 
And lectures — just seven a week. 

" You hold me your thrall," so he told her. 
Pierced through by shy Cupid's keen dart ; 

Now, 't is she is in thralldom to teachers, 
Those masters devoid of a heart. 

fii3) 



"And Don't Forget tl)e Wai^t." 



Your prettiest clothes put on, dears, 
When down to dine you go ; 
Nor think you'll ne'er be seen, dears, 
If you should not do so. 



A silk waist trim and trig, dears, — 

A natty woollen suit ; 
A fresh, unrumpled print, dears. 

With dainty tie so " cute." 



It is a point that 's urged, dears, 
So do not once forget ; 

Or fishermen there are, dears. 
Will have you in the net. 



Look o'er your stock of smiles, dears. 
And eke the brightest choose ; 

And th' most enchanting wiles, dears, 
That you know how to use. 



Then happy shall you be, dears. 
Your meal you will enjoy ; 

Great pleasure shall be yours, dears, 
And freedom from annoy. 



If she that next you sits, dears. 
Should chance to have a guest 

From Wellesley, Harvard, Smith, dears. 
What joy would fill your breast 



At this assuring thought, dears, 
" I 'm at my best to-night ! " 

And easy in your mind, dears. 
You 'd take your evening bite. 



You 'd carry all by storm, dears, 
Your mates, the Fac, the guest : 

The "button 's " totichedhy graceful gown. 
Your young wit does the rest. 



By cheery temper helped, dears. 
By merry, sparkling eyes ; 

By witcheries galore, dears, 
You '11 make your own the prize. 



("4) 



A La^etl Girl. 



A pretty girl, with fetching ways, 

And glorious eyes of blue ; 
I met her at the seaside, and 

She vowed she would be true. 
We strolled at eve by the whispering sea, 

While the pale moon cast its spell 
O'er the nut-brown hair and laughing eye 
Of that sweet girl from Lasell. 
Oh, the laughing wave. 
Oh, the dancing wave, 
That leapt in joyous glee ! 
Oh, the merry wave, 
Oh, the gladsome wave, 
Of that happy, happy sea ! 



But summer passed, as summers do ; 

A last stroll on the shore ! 
I told her that I loved her — but 

She 'd let me say no more. 
'T was only fun for summer days, — 

Another she loved well ! 
This now my song : All men beware 
Of sweet girls from Lasell ! 
Oh, the maddening wave, 
Oh, the moaning wave ; 
I never wish to be 
By the foaming wave, 
By the angry wave, 
Of that sobbing, sobbing sea ! 



(115) 




Y DEAR BLACK EYES: It been a long time since I wrote to you. Things have been 

going on about the same as usual, and I have had of late no more than usual to eat. 

You know we mice who live on the upper floors here at Lasell have a hard time to get 

enough to satisfy us, but I keep on the watch for rooms where birthdays are celebrated, 

and thus get an extra bite occasionally. The other day, when I heard that the inhabitant 

of room thirty-five had a birthday, I went in, hoping to find a few crumbs from the box of candy. 

But what do you think I saw? I was so frightened that I could not move, but hid in a corner to see 

what would happen. 

At a desk sat one of those creatures called girls, anxious-looking but patient. On the bed 
were two more girls, each with an immense lot of paper and lead-pencils of various sizes. 

One of those girls was in a uniform, and said that she had to go to drill presently, and could 
not stay long. She had a sword, and they called her " Captain." I have heard a good deal about 
war recently, and I wonder if they have to train girls for it too? Have you seen any of those 
creatures out your way, with swords and guns? 

One girl sat in a rocking-chair, and had a look of determination on her face, and the question 
she continually asked was this: "What are we going to have at the end?" I'm sure I do not know 
what she meant. 

On the floor sat two girls, one with a book of music under her arm, who said that she had 
to go at three for a music lesson; the other girl sat with watch in hand, for her train left at 3.17, 
and she "'simply could not run." These girls use such queer expressions that I don't quite understand 
all of them. 

Pretty soon there was a knock on the door, and in came two more of the same creatures, 
and the girl at the desk cried, "Oh! there come the business managers. Got any 'ads'?" 

" Everybody has quit advertising," said the new comers, " and we just can't get any more. 
We are nearly dead ; just got in from town ; will be professional beggars before long." Then the 

(116) 



girls said some words which made the faces of the business managers brighten a little, and I was 
glad. It was really pathetic to see them all so cast down. 

Suddenly one of the girls said, "What do you think? One of the Preps promised to write 
something for us. " Hurrah for the Preps ! " cried all the girls at once. " But she just told me," 
went on the first speaker, "that she was so overworked she could not do it." 

" Poor little overworked Preps ! What a shame they have so much to do ! " was the answer. 

" Say," said the girl in the rocking-chair, " I got the cutest poem this morning." 

" Read it ! read it ! " They demanded. 

" Oh ! I forgot it," provokingly said the girl, 

" Girls, I 'm simply discouraged ; everybody is overworked but us ! But we 've got to think. 
Now, Maritta, you and Evelyn do finish up that work you began yesterday, and Frances, please 
finish those poems you wrote. Captain, when will you have those 'statistics' copied? Now, Ruth) 
you won't forget those lists will you ? And to-morrow we '11 get a lot done. Don't forget I " — all 
this from a girl in a gray gown. 

At that moment the bell rang. The girl with the music groaned ; the girl with the watch 
jumped ; the Captain fastened on her sword and vanished, while the rest picked themselves up slowly 
and thoughtfully. 

" Wait, girls," came from the desk ; " we have to have our pictures taken. Can you all go 
Monday? Oh, dear! How shall we ever get the time? But we've got to go." 

But all of the girls had disappeared, leaving the girl they called "chief" alone with me. Her 
head dropped pensively on her hands, and I, a little while after, crept slowly out, very much 
bewildered. I am going again some day, and perhaps I may be able to find out all about what 
they are doing, but just now I do not understand a thing, except that it is " terribly important," and 
must be kept " perfectly secret." 

Hoping to hear from you soon, T am as ever your sincere friend. 

Gray-nose. 

Lasell Seminary, March — , i8 — . 



(117) 





^i4 







/.// 






^' / 









\ 



Index. 



A Lasell Girl 

A Lasell Graduate 

AUerlei Board 

" And Don't Forget the Waist ' 

Basket Ball Teams 

Board of Trustees 

Book Reviews 

Bragdon, C. C. 

Callendar 

Canoe Club . 

Christian Endeavor 

Classes, The . 

Class Night . 

Class of '99 . 

Class Song . 

Commencement Week 

Cooking Classes . 

Dress Cutting 

Drill . 

Ensemble 

Faculty 

Freshman 

Freshman Class 

Gallagher, Rev. Charlts W, 

Ghastly Ghosts 

Gossip 

History of the " Class of the Century ' 

History of the Class of 1901 

In Memoriam 

Instrumental Club 

Junior Class . 

Lasell Building 



Page 

"5 

103 
20 

114 
73 
17 

105 

15 
92 
61 
63 
23 
75 
32 
1 10 

74 
69 

71 
65 
56 
18 
112 

39 

16 

88 

108 

36 
40 

44 
57 
31 
12 



Lasell, Edward 

Lasell Leaves 

Lasellia Club 

Lasellia Club Members 

Lasellia Club Supper 

Missionary Society 

M. W.'s To Be . 

Ninety-eight Enterprise, The 

Ninety-eight's Departure 

Nursery Rhymes of Lasell, with Apologies to Mother Goose 

Oratory 

Preparatory . 

Quartette 

Result of a Reverie 

Rolfe, W. J. 

S. D. Banquet 

S. D. Members 

S. D. Society 

Senior Class . 

Senior Prophecy . 

Senior Statistics . 

Seven Wonders of Lasell 

Shakespeare Class 

Sophomore Class . 

Specials 

Studio . 

Swimming Pupils . 

The Kodak Fiend 

The Masquerade . 

" There are Others " 

The Sorrowful Ballad of the Wretched Visitor 

Vorwort ....... 



PAGE 

14 

54 
49 
51 
52 
62 

91 
26 

27 
86 
70 
43 
55 
"3 
58 
48 

47 

45 

25 
76 

84 
III 

59 
35 
42 
67 

71 
106 
100 

53 
107 

21 



(119) 



Index to Advertisements. 







PAGE 


w 










PAGE 


Springer Brothers 


I 


Putnam & Spooner 123 


Mrs. M. M. Ransom 


I 


Sisson Bros. & Welden 










123 


De Wolfe, Fiske & Co 


I 


Purdy .... 










124 


Howard Watch and Clock Company 


I 


Elmer Chickering 










125 


Kakas Brothers ....... 


2 


H. H. Carter & Co. . 










125 


Cotrell & Leonard ...... 


2 


H. M. Childs . 










125 


Dreka ......... 


2 


Frost & Adams Company . 








• 


125 


Lawrence, Wilde & Co 


2 


Quinsler & Co. 










125 


Lake Shore Railroad ...... 


3 


Dame, Stoddard & Kendall 










126 


Charles W. Hearn 


4 


George E. Johnson . 










126 


Cobb, Aldrich & Co 


5 


Samuel Ward Company . 










126 


Shreve, Crump & Low Co. . 


6 


Dr. Thompson .... 










126 


The Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Co. 


6 


Horgan, Robey & Co. 










126 


Boston & Albany Railroad 


7 


Wauwinet Farm 










127 


A. Stowell & Co 


8 


Johnson Bros. . 










127 


Noyes Brothers ....... 


8 


Alfred Mudge & Son 










127 


Edward E. Babb & Co 


9 


Sturtevant & Haley . 










128 


Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad 


9 


Wads worth, Howland & Co. 










128 


Thomas Long Company . . ' . 


9 


Joshua Thorndike 










128 


O. A. Jenkins & Co 


10 


H. H. Tuttle & Co. . 










128 


W. T. Shepherd . 




121 


Chandler & Barber . 










128 


A Shuman & Co. 




121 


Soule Photograph Company 










129 


Swan, Newton & Co. 


. 


122 


John H. Pray, Sons & Co. 










129 


Bent & Bush 




122 


Chartier .... 










129 


George M. Wethern 




122 


Herbert Art Company 










129 


Martin L. Hall & Co. 




122 


The Moss Photo-Engraving Co. 










129 


N. L. Galarneaux 




122 


Lewando's 










130 


Woodland Park Hotel 




. 123 


S. S. Pierce Company 










130 



(120) 



GUROPG FOR LA$GLLIAn$. 



Mr. WM. T, SHEPHERD, of 384 Boylstoq Street, Boston, Mass., 
Will riiaKe the ninth Tour of Europe and twenty-first popular 
excursion the conriing surnrner, and invites correspondence frorn 
intending tourists, Sailing by stearnship Lucania, travelling by 
swiftest trains, stopping at the best hotels, the wisest adjustrnent 
of tirne and place in sight-seeing, and a liberality of rnanage- 
rnent unsurpassed, the tour will be a counterpart of fornqer ones, 
which hold a high record for success in every particular. 

LASELL FOR EUROPE. 



THE NEW DEPARTURE OF A DISTINCTIVE GARMENT HOUSE. 

Messrs. A. Shuman & Go. 



Announee- 



\\^ith the advent of the Spring Season of Eighteen Hundred Ninety-Eight, 

their New Departure as a Distinctive Garment House, iu the opeuiug of their New Department for 

THE SALE OF LaDIES' SuITS AND LaDIES' CoATS, STRICTLY MeN TaILOR MaDE. 

They propose to conduct this department on the same lines that have made the success of their 
Men's Garment Departments, and it will be seen, therefore, that their enterprise is isolated from the 
ordinary channels of Ladies' Tailoring, and consequently is a novel and desirable addition to the mercantile 
interests of Boston. 

As a Men's Garment House, Messrs. A. Shumau & Co. afford ladies the advantage of men's 
handiwork, so thoroughly essential in the perfection of fit, finish, and contour. 

Foui* Si>a.eioris Elevators. 

SHUMAN CORNER, 
Washington ar^cl Sun-mner Streets = = = = = = = = BOSTON. 

(121) 



S. B. Newton. 



C. F. Kidder. 



J. H. Richardson. 



SWAN, NEWTON & CO., 



DEALERS IN 



Live Pigeons, 5moked Tongues, etc. 

18 and 20 -^^ 

FANEUIL HALL MARKET. 



Telephone, 928 Haymarket. 



Boston. 



M 






-J^ "^ '\[^ ••|/'*^ •'1^ "i^ "^ *J^ -^ 



" Breathes there a man 
With soul so dead 
Who never to himself hath said^ 
This is my own^ my native latidf^ 

DOYOU 
OWN A FLAG? 



u< 



ilk 



Flagfg of all Nations and of all 
Colleges, for patriotic, room decor- 
ations, and for games. 

LOW PRICES. 



4«» 
4^ 



^ 387 Washington Street, BOSTON, MASS. ^i- 



S» .1- -1^ -4*- -4^ ^». i4« -1*. - 1> ^■- »4"- -^ ■^"' •4'- -1 - •<t'- •^'- •^- "^l*- -'I'- -4'- •4'- -4* -4'- -1^ 



FOR FINE niLLINERY VISIT 

GEORGE M. WETHERN, 

21 and 23 Temple Place. 

Strictly First-C/ass Goods at Popular Prices. 

All the latest novelties in Fine Millinery are shown on our counters 
as soon as in Paris, London, or Berlin markets. Your patronage is 
respectfully solicited. 

GEORGE M. WETHERN. 



Martin L Hall & Co. 



_«_ _0><C>^_ 



U/l7olesale (Jroeers, 



Mile. N. L. GALARNEAUX, 



184 Boylston Street, 



Corsets and Exercise Waists* 



70, 11, 12, 13 and 14 South Market, 
33, 34 and 36 Chatham Streets, 



A. J. Adams. 
Fred. P. Virgin. 
Chas. G. Burgess. 



BOSTON 



(122) 



WooJknJ P^rk HoIqI 



, 2) , 9 , 2) 



This favoriU hotel is situated in the beautiful village of :)lul)urndale, 
Mass,, ten miles from Boston, on the Boston & Mhany Railroad. 
The City of Newton, of which :^ul)urndale is one of the wards, is 
celebrated for its fine and interesting drives. The location of the 
hotel is all that could be desired, and the cuisine is of a commendable 
order. Our aim is to extend that cordiality which will induce om guests 
to feel they are at home. For further particulars, address 



C. C. BUTLER, Proprietor. 



Putnam & Spooner, 

. . . Specialists . . . 

BRASS AND IRON BEDSTEADS, 

RELIABLE BEDDING of every description, 

DOWN QUILTS AND CUSHIONS, 
LINEN SHEETS AND PILLOW SLIPS, 
FINE BLANKETS. 



254 Boylston Street, ^z^tJ^t.^^^ Boston^ 

Telephone, Tremont 1019, 



"UBI MEL, IBI APES." 

At a recent Banquet in New York, a witty Parson 
gave the following toast : " Ubi Mel, Ibi Apes." One 
said it meant, " Where there is honey, there will be 
bees," Another said, "Where the carcass is, there 
will the vultures be." Another said, " Where the turtles 
are, the club will be." The last said, " Where the 
cards are, there the chips will be." The Parson dis- 
carded all of these, and said it meant, — 

" Where there is Attraction, 
There will the Admirers be." 

And we said to ourselves, The secret is out, for the 
people still continue to crowd our store, because 
genuine bargains continue here every day. Our 
mail order department is a wonder. It is full of in- 
formation and guidance to those who are not familiar 
with the Dry Goods Business. Samples of Silks, Dress 
Goods, and such things, cheerfully sent. If you 
can't come. Write. 

SISSONBROS.&WELDEN,Binghamton,N.Y. 



(123) 




CLASS PHOTOGRAPHERS, 

Lasell Seminary, '98, ^ dt ^ 



And servings in a similar capacity^ 

A score of other Educational Institutions^- 



«^ fe^ fe^ 



Ample Accommodations and Complete Facilities insure Immediate 
Attention and the Prompt and Careful Execution of every Com- 
mission. All the modern things in Photography. Genuine Carbon 
and Platinum Prints, and our own Matchless and Exclusive C-ennas. 



Studio: 146 TREMONT ST., BOSTON. 



(124) 




H 



AS BEEN CHOSEN OUR CLASS PHOTOG- 
. RAPHER, AND ALL STUDENTS OF LASELL 
. ARE ENTITLED TO SPECIAL RATES AND 
.SPECIAL ATTENTION 

21 West Street, Boston. 



EVERYTHING a student Needs in the 

^ ^ STATIONERY LINE. 

Fountain Pens and Engraved Cards can 
be found in the Co-operative Store of 

H. H. CARTER & n0.. 5 somerset St. 

Discount to Students 20 per ceut. 



H. JVT. OHirvI>«^, 



Dealee in 



Dry and Fancy Goods^ Toys, Stationery, 
Crockery, and Confectionery. 

Also Agency for the American Laundry Co. Call and see Samples. 

COR. AUBURN AND LEXINSTON SfREETS, AUBURNOALE, MASS. 




O ■<HQ.OQ:K-ljjai/l->IO-J'iin< JiiJQ:i/) • Q:ui»-«t- JiUQ;i/i 



QUINSLER & CO. 

26 to 30 Cambria Street, Boston, Mass. 




Manufacturers of Hansom Cabs. 



GEO. J. QUINSLER. 



GEO. U. McNEAR 



Branch Store^ 36 Washington Street, Brookline. 
Agents for the Stearns Bicycle. 



(125) 



ESTABLISHED 1800. 



Toilet Articles, 
Dog Collars, 



Muzzles, Opera Glasses, Purses, 

Leashes, Pocket Books, Manicure Supplies. 



DAME, STODDARD & KENDALL, 

Table Cutlery, Scissors, Pocket Knives, Plated Ware, Fishing Tackle, 

STERLING, RELAY, EAGLE BICYCLES. 

Kodak ; Poco ; Cameras, Bull's Eye, Premo. Developing and Printing a Specialty. 

370=372=374 WASHINGTON STREET, 

Catalogue on application. OPPOSITE BROMFIELD STREET. 



THE NEW FOLDING 
POCKET CAMERA. . 



THE NEW TOURIST 
POCKET CAMERA. . 



Can be Loaded in Daylight. 

Films, Plates, Mounts, Chemicals, and all the latest requisites for 

THE AMATEUR. 

Developing, Printing and Toning done with despatch. 

MORGAN, ROBEY & CO. 

34 BROMFIELD STREET - - - - BOSTON, MASS. 



I Do you use the Boston Papers ? Do 
T you want fine engraving ? Class In- 
o vitations? Visiting Cards? Blank 
'I* Books? or anything in Stationery? 
f We have a stock of $100,000 from 
J w^hich to select. ^ ^ ^ ^ ,^ 

SAMUEL WARD COMPANY, 

49 Franklin Street = = = = = = . = Boston. 




GEORGE E. JOHNSON, 



DEALER IN 



HAY, GRAIN AND FEED, 

LEXINGTON STREET, 

Telephone. AUBURNDALE. 



THE ]S^EXT TIM:E GO TO 

DR. THOMPSON'S 



BL 



WINTERS! 



and have your feet attended to, so that 
you can wear your hoot without flinching- 
Corns, Bunions, Ingrowing and Club 
Nails treated without pain. Also Manicuring; prices moderate. 



Ladies' Room separate, with Maid in attendance. 



(126) 



WAUWINET FARM, 

COMMONWEALTH AVE. AND VALENTINE ST., 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 



JOHNSON BROS.' 

Shoe Manufacturing Company^ 

Manufacturers of the finest 

Ladies', Misses', and Children's Shoes 

IN AMEHIOA. 



$1.50, $2.00, $2.50, and $3.00. 



P. 0. Box 534 



HALLO WELL, ME. 



THIS BOOK FROM OUR PRESS. 



LFRED 

MUDGE & 

SON, ^ ^ PRINTERS, 
24 FRANKLIN STREET, 
BOSTON. ^ ^ 




FRANK H. MUDGE. 
ALFRED MUDGE. 



CLASS PRINTING A SPECIALTY. 



(127) 



STURTEVANT & HALEY, 

Beef and Supply Company, 



38 and 40 Faneuil Hall Market, 



BOSTON 



DBeef , F*oi:"ls., XjA.x*d, XX^^zxxs, 



AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



Established 18^6. 



Incorporated 1891. 



TELEPHONE C O N N E CT 1 O M . 



Special and Exclusive Styles in 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 



Prices from $3.00 to $6.00. 



HENRY H. TUTTLE & CO. 



435 WASHINGTON STREET, CORNER WINTER STREET, BOSTON. 




Beocbes, Tool? &• Supplicj 

Lowest Prices. Headquarters. Send for Catalogue. 
Special discount for Schools and Classes. 

Chandler & Barber, ^^gi/sxoN.''*- 



CARVING TOOLS IN SETS AND SINGLY. 
Send for Catalogue. 



JOSHUA THORNDIKE, 



DEALER IN 



JVEiitton, 

Lamb, 

Veal. 

Stalls 3 and 5 - NEW FANEUIL HALL MARKET, 

BOSTO IV. 



We furnish the best quality at lowest prices, 

AS WE ARE MANUFACTURERS OF 

W. H. & CO. SUPERIOR MOIST WATER COLORS, 

IN TUBES. 

(Recommended by Supervisors of Drawing.) 

ARTISTS' OIL COLORS. In tubes, 

AND EVERY DESCRIPTION OF 

ARTISTS', ARCHITECTS', and 

DRAFTSMEN'S SUPPLIES. 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co. 

(INCORPORATED) 

82 &, 84 Washington Street, ) 

216 &, 218 Clarendon Street Y BOSTON, MASS. 

(Under Hotel Bristol), ) 

Send for 1898 Catalogue. 



(128) 




■ ■ ■ 1 1 1 lv« ■ ■ ■ 



HERBERT aRT 

HARTFORD, CT. 



Make a 
specialty of 



ART NOVELTIES °! ^^^'"^ ^^^^- ^^^^'^^ ^^- 

signs made to otder^ and all 



work guaranteed. They carry every class and kind of embroidery goods and 
materials, and send goods on approval to all parts of the United States. A 
few leading specialties at the present time are : 

Stamped or finished: Tobacco Pouches; Tooth Brush Holders; Photo Frames; Novel Covers; Clipping 
Books; Soldiers' Companions; Soldiers' Writing Cases; *' Remember the Maine" Knapsack Needle 
Books; Old Glory, Army, Navy, Eagle and Liberty Pillow Covers; Red, White and Blue Cable 
Cords ; Foot Ball Pin Cushions and Pillows ; College Flag Pillow Tops ; Bicycle Pillow Tops, and all 
the very latest and best novelties of the season. 

Address all orders to T26 Main St., Hartford, Ct. 



ESTABLISHED 1817. 



JOHN H, PRAY, SONS & CO. 
QarJp^]m^s anb t(p'?o'steT'i|. 

Wholesale and Retail. 
646 to 658 Washington Street, Boston. 



ART PHOTOGRAPHS 



•IN- 



Brown and Gray Carbonette, 
Photograph Mounting and Picture Framing. 

SOULE PHOTOGRAPH CO. 

338 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 



1'iie ]V[0^^ Photo-Engna^ing Go., 

DESIGNERS, ENGRAVERS, 
ELECTROTYPERS, PRINTERS. 



PUCK BUILDING, 

Houston and Mulberry Streets, 



NEW YORK. 



J 51 and J 52 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 



Visit our assortment of 

Ladies' Tailor-made Suits, Imported Jaclcets, Sillc 
and Shirt Waists, and Foreign Dress-goods. . . 

For Price and Style are Unequalled in tine City. 



(129) 



A bit of linen, a needle and thread, 
(For this recipe I will vouch), 

A pretty girl, some cord of red, 
The result — a tobacco pouch. 



" Keep off the grass," was once the style, 

But it is long since then ; 
Now it seems the fashion is, 

" Engaged. Please call again." 



LEWANDO'S 

FRENCH CLEANSERS, 
FANCY DYERS, 

FINE LAUNDERERS, 

17 Temple Place, 

BOSTOJSl. 

479 Fifth Avenue, 

|MEW YORK- 

CLOTHING OF ALL KINDS 

Dyed or Cleansed and Refinished. 

Also Feathers, Gloves, Ribbons, Real Laces, 

Blankets, Curtains, Portieres, Rugs, etc. 




LONDON MIXTURE 

BREAKFAST TEA, 

$1.00 per Pound. 




S.S.PIERCE CO. 

Importers and Grocers, 

TREHONT BUILDING, 

Cor. Tremont and Beacon Streets, 
COPLEY SQUARE, 

CENTRAL WHARF, 



BOSTON- 
COOLIDQES CORNER . . 



BROOKLINE. 



(130) 




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